A New Definition of Leadership

You may not think "leadership" is what you're after, but real leadership doesn't look the way it used to.

C.J. McCollum
C.J. McCollum

Everyday Leaders

Pursuing Passions

Portland Trail Blazers guard C.J. McCollum ’13 led Lehigh’s upset win over Duke in the 2012 NCAA Tournament and was the first Lehigh player to be selected in the NBA draft. McCollum, who studied journalism at Lehigh, has said that he hopes to become a broadcast journalist after his career in the NBA. Through C.J.’s Press Pass, McCollum provides season-long internships to aspiring journalists in Portland high schools.

Hackathon
Hackathon

Everyday Leaders

Making Things Happen

Evan Klein ’18 participated in his first hackathon while in high school. He loved the collaborative spirit of the event and wanted to bring a similar experience to Lehigh. The inaugural LehighHacks event, a 24-hour hackathon, was held on the Mountaintop Campus in spring 2016. 148 students worked in teams to use technology to create unique solutions to problems in financial technology, smart environments and social apps.

Corrin Pimental
Corrin Pimental

Everyday Leaders

Seeking Solutions

Corrin Pimental ’14 knew she wanted to be a bioengineer. During her first-year seminar she watched a professor present his research on epilepsy, with which she’d recently been diagnosed herself. Interested in learning more, Corrin became the professor’s lab assistant and studied how to stop post-traumatic epilepsy from developing. “Research has given me a voice on campus,” she said while at Lehigh. Today, she’s a Ph.D. student in pharmacology.

Kaitlyn Ruffing
Kaitlyn Ruffing

Everyday Leaders

Diving In

Swimmer Kaitlyn Ruffing ’17 came to Lehigh wanting to do as many things as possible, and she has. She holds six all-time school records and was a qualifier for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. She’s also a varsity track athlete, a committed musician and proud member of the Lehigh Orchestra, and a Dean’s List student double-majoring in music and biology with her sights set on medical school.

Admissions Desk
Admissions Desk

Everyday Leaders

Creating Second Chances

The day after Hurricane Sandy hit in October 2012, Brian Slocum ’97 arrived on campus to find that dozens of giant, 300-year-old oak trees had fallen. Slocum, manager of the Wilbur Powerhouse Prototyping Lab and the Chandler-Ullmann wood shop, rescued six 12-foot pieces of trees. He and a team of students gave the historic wood a second life by turning it into tables for campus offices, including the desk standing right here in Lehigh’s admissions theater.

Viktoriia Brezheniuk
Viktoriia Brezheniuk

Everyday Leaders

Taking Risks

Viktoriia Brezheniuk ’15GR, a native of Ukraine, stepped out of her comfort zone in the United States and was driven to make a difference. Brezheniuk, who received a master’s degree in comparative and international education, served as a Lehigh United Nations Youth Representative for several NGOs and accompanied the Ukrainian Mission during the 69th session of the General Assembly of the UN.

Broughal Race Cars
Broughal Race Cars

Everyday Leaders

Inspiring Creativity and Collaboration

Each year, Lehigh mechanical engineering students team up with students at Broughal Middle School and spend a semester designing Matchbox-style miniature race cars, which they then 3-D print and race on campus. Awards include the race winner, “Best in Show” and “Kids’ Choice.” The program promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects at Broughal, a STEM signature school.

Marcos Pires
Marcos Pires

Everyday Leaders

Embracing the Unexpected

Professor Marcos Pires and his team discovered a way to get bacteria to tag themselves for destruction, stimulating the immune system to do the dirty work usually left to antibiotics. When a slight modification unexpectedly worked, a potential new application for their research emerged. Pires emphasizes with his students the importance of keeping an open mind. “If you have the idea in your head that it’s going to be a certain way, you can miss something that can be more interesting,” he says.