DANIEL BOONE (1960)

Key Passages

-- approximate times given are marked from the beginning of the film not the video tape --

Songs

Volume One:  The Warrior’s Path                          Volume Two:  And Chase the Buffalo

         Volume Three:  The Wilderness Road      Volume Four:  The Promised Land

Songs

Repeated throughout the film series, two songs establish and extend a thematic context for this Disney project.  The first song opens and closes each volume:

“Dan’l Boone”

Although his life depended a lot
On every handmade bullet he shot,
The one thing he never learned was this,
He never learned how to miss,
He never learned how to miss,
He never learned how to miss . . .
I guess no man’l ever be Dan’l
Ever be Dan’l, Ever be Dan’l Boone.
The second song is repeatedly sung in all of the films.  The song is created by, associated with, and most often sung by Daniel Boone himself.  Eventually, the settlers traveling through the Kentucky wilderness adopt it as an inspirational theme song.  It is never sung from start to finish but only in selected verses (see film clip for one of the versions):

“And Chase the Buffalo”

Come all you fine, brave neighbors,
Who have a mind to go
To settle in Kentucky
And chase the buffalo.
In some far distant country
Your fortune there will grow
We’ll lay upon the banks of blessed Ohio.

All the way from Yadkin Valley
To Kentucky I did go
To rally round the canebrake And shoot the buffalo.

Come all ye old fine fellows,
It’s time again to range
To some far distant country
Your fortune there to change.
Oh, I’ve got a sweet, sweet little wife
A wife of my own choosin’,
I’ll hug her neat and kiss her sweet
And go no more a-courtin’.

The rabbit shot the monkey
And the monkey shot the crow
We’ll ramble in the canebrake
And shoot the buffalo.

Volume One:  The Warrior’s Path

00:10  Walt Disney Introduces the Film Series and Daniel Boone
Disney includes Daniel Boone in a pantheon of heroes who were compelled to “push beyond the boundaries of civilization to find out what was on the other side of the mountain or the other side of the sea . . . The trailblazers [were] the first to venture into the realm of the unknown . . . Perhaps the most famous trailblazer of them all was Dan’l Boone, the hero of our adventure series based on the life of the famous frontiersman . . .  The whole of the Ohio River Valley was an unexplored wilderness which no white man had ever seen.  The Indians called it Kaintuck and rumors of its fertility and abundance of game drifted back to the ears of young Boone in North Carolina and so excited his imagination he had to see it.  Now, Daniel didn’t need much encouragement.  A born hunter-trapper with an itching foot, he needed plenty of elbow-room and it was getting crowded in the Yadkin Valley.  Why, he complained that on a clear day he could see the chimney smoke of his nearest neighbor some six miles away!  So with his famous rifle Ticklicker, Boone headed west.”

03:52  Finley Hyperbole and Fabled Kaintuck’; “Kaintuck opened up before ya like a ripe melon waitin’ to be enjoyed”
Boone:  A man who’s been married only three weeks can’t go gallavantin’ anywheres, not even to Kentucky
Finley: Dan’l, Kaintuck is as full of bar and deer as a gourd is a’ seeds.  And huntin’ like no man ever dreamed of.  Game, wild geese, why a man can’t hardly breathe for fear of gettin’ choked with feathers.  Dan’l, there’s deer at every salt lick, and buffalo, buffalo so thick on the traces, the ground’s just a-rumbling with their hoof beats.
B:  Mr. Finley, I’m gonna be a farmer.  That’s what I promised Rebecca on our weddin’ day.
F:  Dan’l, land was what I wasn’t gonna talk about ‘cause I was afraid you might think I was a lawyer.  But in Kaintuck, in Kaintuck the land is pure magic.  Ya plant it and cultivate it, and ya git twenty bushels to the acre.  And if ya just plant it, ya get ten.  And iffen ya don’t plant it, ya get seven . . . Boy, find that [Warrior’s] path and you got Kaintuck opened up before ya like a ripe melon waitin’ to be enjoyed.
B:  New land, where the grass ain’t been a-turned over by the plow.  And where the flowers grow in the soil where they was born. And the game . . . Can you find this Warrior’s Path, Mr. Finley?
F:  We’ll find it together, Dan’l.  I’ll help ya find it.  I got to find it afore I die.
B:  I want to find it too, Mr. Finley.  I want to stand on a high place and see the land as far as the eye can see . . . Elbow-room, space to breathe.  Without it a man thinks mean, he’s small when he could be big.

8:38  Daniel’s Natural Philosophy Changes Rebecca’s Mind; “Things gotta keep changin’ and growin’”
Rebecca:  The way you look at those mountains.  Those are the only times I’m ever jealous.  What is it you’re looking for, Daniel?
Daniel:  Whatever’s on the other side.
R:  There’s land enough here for us, in Yadkin Valley.  All the land we’ll ever need.
D:  Not for me and not for my children.  Not if I can give them a strange new earth and a new sky.
R:  Why strange, why new?
D:  ‘Cause things gotta keep changin’ and growin’ or they just curl up and die, like people.  I guess I ain’t makin’ my point too good.
R:  (changing her mind and tone)  I think you are, too good.
D:   Oh, of course, like you always say:  “Poor John Finley is a born liar!”  Most likely no such thing like a Warrior’s Path anyway.
R:   But maybe there is, Daniel.
D:   Even if there is, maybe nobody that can find it.
R:   You can, Daniel!  You can!

10:25  Boone and Judge Henderson; “A new empire called Kaintuck”
Boone:   . . . a land of milk and honey, judge.   With buffalo so thick on the traces, the ground just rumbles with their hoof beats.
Judge Henderson:  Daniel, you’re crazy!
B:  Let’s just argue about one thing at a time.  Find the Warrior’s Path and someday there’ll be a road for wagons and settlers.
H:  It’s a fine dream, Daniel, but like most of your dreams, impractical!  The law forbids anyone to set foot west of the mountains.
D:  ‘Tain’t a good law!--no matter who made it.  And ya can’t stop folks once they get their mind set.
H:  Perhaps not.
D:  Judge, there’s a new empire out there.  A new empire called Kaintuck.  A man gets it for nothing, and he sells it for clear profit.
H:  Still, I can have nothing to do with your plans as long as I sit on the bench.  Can’t you understand that, Daniel?
D:  Yes, I can understand.
H:  Well, give my best to your lovely young bride.
(Daniel walks to the door.  Henderson slips a wad of money out of his pocket and drops it on the floor.)
H:  Wait!  (he picks up money) You dropped this money.  Must be yours, no one else is here. That’ll help you get lead, horses, powder, salt, whatever else you need.
D:   I’ll pay ya back, Judge, every cent.

22:51  The Commanding Ridge; “Strange, new land, a new sky”
After the men travel the Warrior’s Path to a mountain crest, Daniel dismounts and heads off alone.
Stuart:  Where you goin’, Daniel?
Boone:  I’m goin’ to find me a far seeing place, something I promised me and Rebecca.
(He climbs and then arrives at a lookout)
Boone:  Strange, new land!  A new sky!
Finley:  It’s all I said it was, ain’t it Dan’l?
Boone:  You couldn’t lie enough to do it justice, friend.
(Boone then sings and carves an inscription in a tree there)

24:55  Finley’s Dying Words; “It’s dark, Kaintuck, blood ground”
Finley:   Dan’l, you’re one of the humans I liked real fine.  I showed ya my dream, boy. I don’t know how much favor I’ve done ya.  It’s dark, Kaintuck, blood ground.

27:27  “Maybe I can win us some votes”
Daniel:   War club.  That’s for our benefit, Johnny.  They use it to vote if we live or die.  Maybe I can win us some votes.  (He approaches Shawnee and prepares to do his knife swallowing trick.)

29:57  Daniel Loses Shooting Match with Crow Feather; “You missed on purpose”
During captivity, Daniel is challenged to a shooting match by Crow Feather.  He explains why he throws the match:
Stuart:  What’s this all about, Daniel?  You missed on purpose.
Boone:  Crow Feather wanted me to win.  If Idda been too good, we wouldn’t have the chance of a snowball in the hottest pit of purgatory.

31:40  Blackfish Speaks to Captives, Issues Warning (Warning #1 of 8); “You will go home . . . These hunting grounds belong to Indian”
Blackfish:  You will go home.  Do not come back.  These hunting grounds belong to Indian. Wild animals are to us as cattle to white man.  All fur and skins belong to Indian.  You will go.  Do not come back.
Crow Feather:  And if you are so foolish as to come back, you can be sure that the wasps and the yellow jackets will sting you severely.
Blackfish:  Go!

33:29  John Stuart Challenges Boone’s Order; “I’m not goin’ back empty handed”
Boone:  You’re goin’ back to Yadkin Valley alone, Johnny.
Stuart:   Aw Daniel!
B:    I’m not even gonna argue with ya.
S:   Aw Crow Feather really didn’t mean that talk about the wasps and the yellow jackets stingin’ us!
B:   Yeah, he meant it, all right.
S:   Yeah, but you just can’t . . .
B:    I’m not goin’ back empty handed.  I have a debt to pay Judge Henderson.
S:    I’ll help ya hunt.
B:    I still got things to see here in Kentucky.
S:    Well, I can help you find ‘em.
B:    I can’t hear ya. (He covers his ears.)
S:    But . . .
B:    I’m deafer than a woodpecker in a hail storm!
S:    I’ve never stood up against you before, Daniel.  Don’t make me do it now.
B:    Have you seen all the things you want in your short life?  Are you ready to die?
S:    (covers his ears)  I can’t hear ya . . . We can hunt separately.  We’d have a better chance to stay hid that way.
B:    All right, that’s the way it is.   We’ll meet here each night and hide our furs.  But take care, Johnny, take care.

36:00  Hideout Cave & “Think Injun”
Back at the hideout cave, Daniel and Squire talk about the dangers that the Indians pose.  With John Stuart now dead danger seems all the more real.
Squire:   Life is gonna be total quiet for us while we hunt, or total short.
Boone:   Squire, I want you to go back.
S:   Like I said, Rebecca is well took care of.  For a while anyway.  Nobody needs me back home.
B:   It’s gonna be some chancey.  Not being able to risk a shot for fear aletting the Indians know we’re here.
S:   We know some tricks too.  We blunt a trail pretty good.  Think Injun.  It’s a tender juicy cut of country worth seeing.
D:    . . . We’re staying just till we get furs enough to pay off Henderson . . . And if I stay a minute longer, Kaintuck or no, I want you to wallop the tar out of me!

39:00  Dying Shawnee and Biblical Lessons;  “If thine enemy be hungry, feed him”
On their way home with their horses packed with fur, the Boones find an old dying Indian.
Daniel:  His people have left him here to die because he ain’t a use anymore.
Squire:  An eye for an eye, Dan’l.  For Johnny!
D:  I know.  But seems I remember something else from the same book. ‘If thine enemy be hungry, feed him.  If he be thirsty, give him water to drink.’

40:30   “You are more Indian than you know”; Another Match between Daniel and Crow Feather
Having been nursed by the Boones, an old dying Shawnee is revived.  The smoke from their fire attracts the Shawnee, led by Chief Blackfish.
Blackfish:  For many moons you have covered your tracks well, Wide Mouth.  You are more Indian than you know.
Boone:  I have taught myself to think like my red brothers.
BF:  Indian would not build fire even to feed dying one. (Crow Feather lunges for Boone, but Blackfish restrains him).  It was foolish to allow yourself to be caught because of aged one, but the deed was from the heart.  And for this reason you will leave this country, but you will go as you came, with nothing that belongs to Shawnee,    not one hide of deer, not one pelt of beaver.  Now go quickly, while I talk with my brothers.
B:  Nuh-uh.  I’m not leaving behind what I worked for so long.  I propose a match.  Me and Crow Feather here have us little match, with the only thing I’m only half way good at.
Crow Feather:  White man is no match for Crow Feather.
B:   No match!  Ha-ha-ha.  Why I made you run and squeal like a frightened squaw. (he jumps around imitating the Indians being stung by wasps)  And I didn’t need a tomahawk nor a rifle to do it with neither.
BF:  And what will this match decide?
B:    If I lose, I’m your prisoner but my brother goes free.  But if I win, we both leave.We take our furs and we take our rifles.
CF:    Let it be so.

45:10  Blackfish Issues Another Warning (Warning #2);  “The redman world is growing smaller.  We must fight to survive”
Blackfish:  I warn you.  Do not come back again.  The redman world is growing smaller.  We must fight to survive.  And to survive we must kill.  I say this so you may tell others who may wish to come.

45:55  Daniel Returns Home to Yadkin and Names his Son; “Make the farm pay”
Daniel names his son James Finley Stuart Boone.
Boone:  The Finley Stuart part, that’ll remind me to stay home.  Settle down.  Make the farm pay.

47:06  Rebecca and Daniel at Home;  “Elbow room.  Space to breathe”
Rebecca:  If you’ll live to be a hundred and have a hundred children, you’ll never stay put while there’s a mountain to be crossed.
Daniel:  Well, maybe I didn’t get rich, Rebecca, but I did see Kaintuck, all of it.  And I did see a new sky and a strange new earth.  And I saw grass that was almost as blue as the sky at night.  And I heard streams that sing all loud and clear.  Elbow room, Space to breath. (Rebecca is clearly inspired by Daniel’s words as she too gazes off at the mountains.)

Volume Two:  And Chase the Buffalo

06:30   Rebecca and Daniel Discuss Wanderlust, Rebellionists, and Home; “You never saw one of your children born”; “You’re still dreaming about Kentucky, courting it like a man does a woman”
Rebecca:  You remember Mr. Finley because you were there.   You saw him killed and his suffering was yours.  You don’t remember mine because you weren’t there. You never saw one of your children born.
Daniel:  I know what you are trying to say, Rebecca.  But huntin’s the thing I know best . . . I tried freighting and blacksmithing, you know I did.
R:  I know you did, you tried hard.  But the truth is we’re more in debt now than we ever were.
D:  It‘s no disgrace to be taken to debtors’ court.  Why, half the men in Yadkin Valley have been there since they raised the taxes.  It’s the fault of them thieving, mealy-mouthed land agents.
R:  Now you sound like Mortecai Thompkins and the Rebellionists.
D:  Well I’m not.  I’d like to fill some of them sneaking tax collectors full of buck shot like Cecil Calbert did . . .
R:   And end up in jail like him.
D:  Oh, I don’t care.
R:   Now is that anyway for a good Quaker husband to sound?
D:   No, I suppose not.  There’s been too much violence anyway and you know why?   There’s too many dad-drab people trying to settle in one place. Do you know that I heard that there’s 50,000 souls now just in North Carolina, and I can see the smoke from the Watkins’ cabin.
R:  I know what you’re leading up to, Daniel Boone.  You’re getting ready to go off into the wilderness and chase the buffalo.  Will you be honest with yourself for once, Daniel?  Why you really go off on these hunting trips and risk being killed by Indians.  You’re still dreaming about Kentucky, courting it like a man does a woman.   What did you get out of that paradise on earth, Daniel?  Two graves:  Johnny Stuart’s and Mr. Finley’s. You’ve seen  all there is to see of Kentucky.  Stay home!
D:    Yeah, you’re right, Rebecca.  There’s no need to say any more.  There’ll never be another hunting trip to Kentucky.  This year or never. Never another hunting trip.

14:30  Boone Teaches His Son How to “Think Indian”
Boone:  We’re gonna settle down there . . .  whole hog, right down to the last detail.  We’re gonna settle down on land that runs as far as the eye can see.  We’ll spread out on it, breathe in deep.  And I’m gonna need a good man at my side.  Like I always say, ‘The only way to live to a ripe old age in Indian country is to think Indian.’  So from today on I’m gonna teach you all the tricks I know about the woods.  The first thing I’m gonna teach you is that all sounds in the woods mean something.

29:05  Squire and Daniel Discuss Rebellionist Cause; “The rebel can’t keep turning the other cheek”; “I take things at my own gait, single harness.”
Squire:  I hate going against you, Dan’l but Mortecai’s right.  Sooner or later we’re gonna hafta stand up to the militia. The rebel can’t keep turning the other cheek . . . You’re gonna have to stop preaching peace. We’re gonna hafta fight, Dan’l and you’re gonna hafta do your share.
Daniel:  A share of violence.  Why it goes clear against my nature.  You know that.
S:   But we have no choice, Dan’l.  Else we all end up in debtor’s court, like you. Everybody knows you’re going again tomorrow.
D:  That’s right, it’s the law.  Either you obey the law or you move on.
S:   The law!  Well, law or no law, we ain’t gonna take things laying down and Cecil ain’t gonna hang.
D:   And I take things at my own gait, single harness.

29:20  Governor and Judge Henderson Discuss Rebellionist Uprising; “Flames of sedition”
Henderson:  Those men out there are farmers, not criminals.  They feel they have a just grievance against the crown . . .
Governor:     That’ll be enough Henderson.  I don’t want to hear no more about taxes . . . It’s quite obvious that I’m correct; Yadkin Valley is the hotbed of the revolution. . . . What’s going on in this country, sir could lead to general revolt. The flames of sedition must be put out, before they get spread.

37:45  Boone Speaks to the Masses; “Runnin’ out of geography”  (see essay)  (see film clip)
After winning the fight against Mortecai, Daniel climbs the pillory and speaks to the men.  His words quell the rebellion.
Boone:  What I got to say is simple.  Most of you have heard it before.  Our problem, yours and mine, is this.  We’re just plumb runnin’ out of geography.  It’s a mean, small life when a man’s gotta haggle over every foot of ground he works.  And quarreling, like we done today, will do about as much good as kicking a hog barefooted.  (they all laugh)
Sam Watkins:  What the answer, Dan’l?  Kentucky?
B:  That’s right.  It’s a creation, big land just running over with the good things of life.  You tell ‘em, Squire.  You seen it!
Squire:  Well, Dan’l’s right.  There’s an ocean of flowers, plenty of game, and nobody to talk sassy to you.
W:  Not even tax collectors!  (all laugh)
B:    Well, one that goes that far’ll be too tired to talk. (all laugh) And hunting . . . Why near one of those salt licks, I seen a buffalo so big, I had to look three times to see all of it (all laugh)
Man:  But you ain’t talkin’ about huntin’ now.
B:   No, I’m talking about settlin’.
Mortecai:    . . .Why ain’t you picking up and leavin’?
B:   Why that’s a good question, Mortecai.  Fact is, I’m turnin’ it over in my mind right now.  Anybody want to buy a good farm?
S:    But Dan’l you can’t do it, you owe the debtor’s court!
D:    So, let ‘em take their money from the sale.  Well, Do I hear any takers?  $200 for good bottom land, and I’ll throw in that blasted plow for good measure!  (all give out a loud cheer)

40:40  Rebecca and Daniel Discuss Moving; “For once, Daniel, I will not do what you ask me to”
Rebecca:   So, you sold the farm . . . Do you know what it's meant to me that you’ve always had to see what’s on the other side of the mountain?  Do you know how I kept myself from going out of my mind with loneliness?  Alone at night, I’d put on this wedding dress and think about all the plans we made when we were married.
Daniel:  I’m sorry.
R:  Those times when I thought you were dead.  Do you know how I would keep myself from crying?
D:   No.
R:   I’d take one of the children with me and I knew I wouldn’t allow myself to cry.
D:   But honey, that’s all over.  We’ll be together all the time now.
R:   No, Daniel.  Ever since I was a child, I’ve heard people talk, the ones who tried to settle in the wilderness, what it’s like to hunt for your supper in the winter when there’s nothing to hunt for, when you see Indians axing your young ones in your own dooryard.
D:   But others have in faith in me.   Why Cecil Calbert will come with his wife, the Watkins’s with their two children.
R:   For once, Daniel, I will not do what you ask me to.
D:   But Rebecca! I don’t under . .  .
R:   The children and I will move in with my folks in town.
D:   Rebecca, I love you too much to force you to do anything, but I’m going.

Volume Three:  The Wilderness Path

05:10  “Mom, What’s a Bride?”;  “sweet talks . . . like your Pa”
After hearing his father remark on how Rebecca is prettier than a new bride, young Israel Boone has questions:
Israel:   What’s a bride?
Rebecca:   A bride?, Oh, she’s a young newly married woman.
I:   How does she get to be a young newly married woman?
R:  Well, she meets up with some nice young man who catches her eye, and he sweet talks her.
I:    Like Pa?
R:   Yes, Israel, like your Pa.

05:48  Camp on the Trail; “Sea of grass”
Doctor:   [Is Kentucky grass] honest to goodness blue or another one of yer dern stories?
Boone:  Why Doc, I ain’t telling a story, why that grass out there is so blue, it’s like a reflection of the clean winter sky in a pool of deep water.  It stands waist high and when that wind leans on it, that sea of grass is like rippling waves as far as the eye can see.  Why, Doc, sometimes I wished I was a horse so’s I could get my belly full of grass.  (they laugh)

07:15  Rebecca Urges Daniel to Help Reconcile Newlyweds; “They’ll probably make you godfather to their children”
Rebecca observes Bud Yancey making his bed under the wagon.
Rebecca:  Daniel, do you see what I see?
Daniel:  Depends on where you’re looking.
R:  Over there.
D:  I see Bud Yancy crawling under his blankets like I oughta be doing?
R:  But where?
D:   Under his wagon.
R:   Exactly, that’s my point.  They’ve only been married three days.
D:   Well, it’s a free country, a man can sleep under his wagon if he wants to.  Well, can’t he?
R:   Well, you didn’t when we’d only been married for three days . . .
D:   Yeah, well . . . maybe he just likes fresh air.
R:    No, there’s something wrong.  I’ve been watching that young couple.  She cries every time he looks at her.
D:    First thing in the morning, I’ll tell him not to look at her.  Now, will you please go to bed!
R:    (raises her voice) Do you think that I can go to sleep knowing that  poor girl over there is crying her heart out because of a silly lovers’ quarrel?
D:    So, now they’ve quarreled, I suppose the next thing you’ll tell me that it’s Bud’s fault!
R:    Well, of course, you don’t think she’s crying for no reason at all, do you?
D:    I give up!  Good night.
R:    Daniel, please . . .. they are so young and terribly frightened.  Have a talk with Bud and tell him to admit he’s wrong and make up with Maybelle.
D:    Me, I ain’t his old man!
R:    Oh, please Daniel.  They’ll be so grateful to you, they’ll probably make you godfather to their children.
D:    Will you go to bed if I do?
R:     Yes.
D:     All right, get the _____ bottle ready, I feel a punch in the nose comin’ on.

09:15  Boone Advises Bud Yancey on Women; “Woman’s usually at the bottom of a man’s trouble”, “Just say you’re sorry and your trouble’s over”
Daniel says he knows that Maybelle is troubling him.
Bud:   How’d you know”
Boone:  Woman’s usually at the bottom of a man’s trouble.
Bud:  That’s the truth.
Boone:   . . . Just say you’re sorry and your trouble’s over . . . You just listen to your uncle Dan’l.  He’ll show you how to make a woman think she’s won a victory.

12:50  I told you so!; “Not half as lovely as you, Mrs. Boone”
Rebecca:   I told you something was wrong. Well, what are you going to do about it?
Daniel:   There you go again: what am I gonna do about it!  Well, the answer is nothing, at least until we get to camp and Gass’s trading post tomorrow night.  Then I’ll put it before a meeting and let the folks decide.  Now, good night.
R:   Daniel, she’d make a lovely bride in my wedding dress.
D:   (looks at her and glows with desire)  Not half as lovely as you, Mrs. Boone.  (they kiss)

20:20  When Does the Honeymoon Start?
As the Yancey wedding celebration winds down, Daniel embarrasses the couple:
Boone:  (shouts)  Bud, in case I didn’t tell ya, you don’t have to sleep under the wagon tonight!  (all roar in laughter.  The couple gets up and leaves, smilingly nervously)

35:30  Boone & Crow Feather To Trade “Boy for a Boy”
Crow Feather:  He comes crawling, begging for the life of his son.
Boone:  I come walking, Crow Feather. It’s you who crawls at break of day to attack sleeping women and children.

38:00  Blackfish Warns Boone, Again (Warning #4)
Blackfish:  I promise you safety back to the Captain’s Trading Post.  If you go back to Caroline, all will be well.  If you choose to go on, I cannot answer for your safety.

38:40  Little Black Bird and James Boone Exchange Goodbyes
Little Black Bird:  Good bye, little Shatoowa. (smiles)
James Boone: (smiles)  Good bye, Little Black Bird.
(other Shawnee boys smile too. Crow Feather stares angrily at them)

38:50  Father and Son; “Shatoowa . . .  what does that mean?”
James’s tender feet are cut.
Daniel:  You stood up to them real good.  I was real proud.  Shatoowa, the boy called you . . . what does that mean?
J:   Little Wire, that’s what they were going to call me after they adopted me.
D:  That’s a good name for you.  Well, climb aboard, Shatoowa.  We’ll give your feet a rest.

39:30  Crow Feather Attacks Boone Camp; “Better kill me, Long Knife.  I will try again”
Boone:  I don’t want to kill you, Crow Feather.  But I will if you make force me.
Crow Feather:  One of us must die.  Shoot or I will kill you.
(Boone shoots but rifle doesn’t fire; Crow Feather attacks and they fight)
Eventually, Crow Feather is defeated and at Boone’s disposal.
CF:  Better kill me, Long Knife.  I will try again.
B:   I’m taking you back to Blackfish. (To James) Is your gun loaded?
J:    Uh huh.
D:   Let this be a lesson to you, boy.  Don’t ever forget to load your gun.
J:    A lesson to me, Pa?
D:   Well, a lesson to both of us.

45:10  Blackfish Proposes Peace; “I can’t shake with you, chief, because I’m not going back”; Warning #5
Boone:  Chief Blackfish speaks with crooked tongue. He speaks of peace and friendship. He gives his word that no harm will come to us, then he sends Crow Feather to do his killing under cover of darkness.
Blackfish:   I did not send this man.  He acted on his own.  I promise you, Boone, he will be punished for bringing dishonor upon us.  Let there be no mistrust between your people and mine, Boone.  Let us pledge the peace anew, go back, and all will be well.  (extends hand to shake)
B:  I can’t shake with you, chief ‘cause I’m not going back.  There’s a big, new land out there called Kentucke. It’s big enough for you and me and a million others to live on in peace, if you want it that way.

Volume Four:  The Promised Land

00:12  Walt Disney Reviews Volumes One through Three and Introduces the Fourth and Final Volume
Pointing to an old map, Walt Disney tells a narrative that provides a historical context for the series as a whole.  Also, it furnishes viewers with a summation of the first three volumes: “By today’s standards that’s a pretty crude map made up of a little bit of knowledge, and hearsay, and quite a bit of guess work.  It’s simple enough now to find errors in it, but let’s try to see it the way it must have looked to those who depended upon it.  For instance, Daniel Boone had studied just such a map as this, but what he saw was a beautiful, virgin land with great valleys and room to breathe, not merely good land but a good life.  The Indians saw it differently.  To them, this was their hunting ground, their survival. They had no wish to share it. And, thus, from the start of his first visit to Kaintuck, Daniel Boone knew that he walked in danger to a land where he was not wanted.  He faced resentment in the eyes of many Indians. But not until he met Crow Feather did he meet deceit and treachery.  Fairly beaten and
thus humiliated before his own people, Crow Feather swore his vengeance against the invading Daniel Boones.  Years later as Boone was leading his family and a group of his neighbors and friends to this great virgin land, he found that his old enemy had neither forgiven nor forgotten.  It was Crow Feather who led the treacherous attack on Gass’s Trading Post, in violation of the truce guaranteed by his own people. The story you are about to see is titled “The Promised Land."  It is the story of the many who started out in pursuit of a dream and of the few who
saw it through.

07:10   Maybelle Yancey Speaks in Finleyesque Hyperbole; “A magic land”
Bud:  We’re going back.  I’m gonna get you to see a Doctor.
Maybelle:  Oh no, Bud.  Please, I’ll be all right.
Bud:    There’s nothing out there in Kentucke that’s worth it.  (Boone rides up and listens in, smiling.)
Maybelle:  Oh yes, there is.  There is a new land.  An ocean of flowers, like Mr. Boone said, more beautiful than any white man’s ever seen before.  And a sea of grass as blue as a mountain lake and so deep that the deer and buffalo can hide from a hunter’s gun.  A magic land richer than a plow’s ever turned, just waiting.  It is like that, isn’t Mr. Boone?
Boone:  That’s the way it is, Maybelle.  Even though some folks say it is just a dream. Whether you two go on or go back, is up to you.  I’ll help you any way I can.

10:30  Crow Feather Threatens Boone; “I’ll trail you by day, watch you by night, until I kill you”
Crow Feather’s tomahawk narrowly misses Boone and strikes a nearby tree.
Boone:  (to James)  I beat him once in a fair fight.  He won’t rest till he kills me.
Crow Feather:  You made me lose face with my people.  Even if you go back, I must kill you.
B:  I ain’t going back.  I’m going on to Kaintuck’.
CF:  You’ll never make it, Boone.  I’ll trail you by day, watch you by night, until I kill you.
B:   In that case, you’ll want your weapon back. (he throws tomahawk back and as Crow Feather reaches for it, Boone fires his rifle)
CF:   You tricked me, Boone.  My turn next.
They go back to camp and Boone tells James not to tell the others.

20:30  Blackfish Issues Warning (Warning #6); Led by Blackfish and a white flag, Shawnee approach settlers’ camp.
Blackfish:  You were foolish to come back.
Boone:  Is that why you sent Crow Feather to attack us?
BF:  I did not send him.  Crow Feather is outlaw.  He has been banished from the tribe for breaking peace.  That is why he ran when he saw me.  He knew I would not approve of what he has done.
B:   I’m glad to hear you say that.  I’d rather have you on our side.
BF:   Do not forget, Boone.  I am Indian.  Kaintuck is Indian hunting ground.  There is no room for white man.  You must turn back.
B:   What if we don’t?
BF:  My people will fight for what is theirs.  (Speaks up to all settlers)  Hear me.  Listen to me.  Gather your women and children and turn back.  My braves will see you safely to Gass’s Trading Post.
B:    Well, what do you have to say folks?
Sam:   Well, I for one got a belly full of mud keepin’ one eye on those .  .  . varmints.  I say let ‘em keep Kaintuck.
Sarah:  Don’t stand there, Dan’l.  Tell ‘im we’re goin’ back.
Mortecai:  Hold on there, Sarah.  You and Sam can speak for yourselves.  I’m ready to go on. (after this comment, Mark and his family, Bud and Maybelle Yancey, and the Doctor say they will return to North Carolina)

23:00  Boone’s Leadership is Questioned; “You’re a fool chasing fool’s gold”; Blackfish’s Warning #7
Sarah:  You’re our leader.  It’s your duty to think of our safety.
Boone:  I ain’t forgetting my duty, Sarah.  And I ain’t forgetting all the hard work it took us to get this far.  I just don’t want to see it go to waste.
S:  Better go to waste than be our grave.  You heard the chief.  If we go on it’ll be the end of us.
D:  Not the end, Sarah.  The beginning.  This country of ours is like a growing youngster, just busting out at the seams.  It needs elbow room, breathing space.  There’s a land out there bigger than all the thirteen colonies put together.  Just waiting like a ripe melon to be opened and enjoyed.
Sam Watkins:  You’re a fool chasing fool’s gold.  You’ll come to no good end.
Sarah:  Oh stop talking.  Let’s get the wagon loaded.
B:  Well, you heard my people, Blackfish.  They’ve accepted your escort back to the trading post.
BF:   And what about you?
B::   I’m going on.
BF:   Boone, you will make Kaintuck a Dark and Bloody Battleground.
B:   It don’t have to be.  Kaintuck’s big enough for all of us.

24:15  Rebecca and Daniel Disagree, Rebecca Is Converted Again; “I see a new colony being born, a new nation maybe”
James:  I’ll go with you, Pa.
Boone:   I know you will son, and Rebecca . . . (walks to her, quick glimpse of Blackfish) . . . well, Rebecca?
Rebecca:   I didn’t want to say this to you, Daniel, but you’re making me.  Sarah is right.  Your dream is no good.  It’s a nightmare of mud and filth and spoiled food, of lying awake at night listening to your babies cry in their sleep.  If not for your own sake, then for your children.  Give up this foolish dream and turn back before it’s too late.
B:  Turn back to what?  Debtor’s court, sharecropping?  Trying to scratch a living out of worn out ground?
R:  We had a roof over our head, didn’t we?   We had a bed to sleep in and a fire to keep us warm.  What do we have now?  Look! (she points to their overturned wagon with pieces of furniture scattered for shelter from gun fire)  The sum total of our married life!  And all because of this foolish dream of yours!
B:  Rebecca, listen!
R:  I don’t want to listen. I’ve listened long enough.  I want to go back with the others.
B:  All right, all right.  If that’s the way you feel.  I love you and the children enough to give it up if you say so.  (Rebecca is surprised)  I’ll never mention Kaintuck again.  It was a good dream while it lasted and big enough for all of us. I’m just sorry you and the kids didn’t get to see it.  It wasn’t really a dream, it was just so beautiful it just seemed like one.  A sea of grass of flowers and the land so rich, the poorest acre made a man feel like a king.
R:   Do you really see all that?
D:   Yeah, that and more.  I see a new colony being born, a new nation maybe.  Full of people living in fine homes. I see church steeples rising above the trees from one end of Kaintuck to the other. (laughs)  There I go, just when I said I’d never mention Kaintuck again. I swear Rebecca . . .
R:   Good Quakers don’t swear.  And you can mention Kaintuck whenever you want because it is going to be our home.
B:   Our home!
R:   In sickness and in health, wherever thou goest, I goest Daniel.  I made a vow remember. Please, help me not to forget it.

28:20  Crow Feather the Outcast; “The sheep run for cover.  The lion goes on”
Crow Feather:  The sheep run for cover.  The lion goes on.
Another Indian:    The lion is your enemy (my italics).   We are tired of living apart from our people.  We give them to you.  (all but a couple Shawnee outcasts abandon Crow Feather)
CF:   I too am tired of being an outcast, but I can’t go back until I settle with Boone.

35:42   Gold Bullets!
After Boone learns that Woody doesn’t have the lead he was to carry but has gold coins instead, Boone is in despair over their lack of ammunition.
James:  (holding Woody’s gold coins) Pa, will these melt down?
Boone:  They sure will, son.  Nice shiny metal, Mr. Woody.  We’re gonna have ourselves some real fine bullets, and I’m gonna take extra pleasure in makin’ ‘em.
Woody:  Not my gold, Boone.
Boone:  Yes, Woody, your gold!  Every time you hear a shot I want you to figure how much your treachery is costing you.

45:40  Boone Thanks Blackfish for Saving His Life and Blackfish Issues Warning #8; “You go at your own risk”
When Crow Feather is about to drive his tomahawk into Boone, Blackfish appears and shoots Crow Feather, using Mortecai’s gun.  Boone is grateful for Blackfish’s fine shot, and he thanks the chief.
Boone:  Much obliged, chief.
Blackfish:  I did not kill him to save your life, Boone.  But because He deserved to die.  If you are wise, you will turn around and forget Kentucke.
Boone:  And if I don’t.
Blackfish:   The dangers are many.  You go at your own risk.  (He leaves.)

46:10  Back at Boone Cave
James:  Did you kill him, Pa.
Boone:  No, I didn’t kill him.
J:  Well, is he comin’ back?
B:  No, never.
J:   Then we’re going on? To Kentucke?
B:  We sure are, we sure are.

47:05  At Commanding Ridge; “She’ll take a thousand men”
Boone, his family, and Mr. Woody stand on Commanding Ridge in front of the tree inscribed in 1760:  “Here is Good Land Boys D.Boone.”
Daniel:  There she be folks, Kentucke.  She’ll take a thousand men with a thousand dreams and still be hardly touched. (To Rebecca) Ain’t it everything I said it was?
Rebecca:   Everything, Daniel, everything.
 
 

Copyright (c) 2001 by Keat Murray, Graduate student at Lehigh University.

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