office of student conduct

Academic Resource Guide

Academic Advising

The academic advisers for all first-year students are assigned by the particular college. For upper-class students who have declared majors, the academic adviser is the department chairperson or an assigned faculty member of the specific curricula. Such matters as pre-registration, changes in roster (course drop or add), requests for pass/fail grading, etc. are affected through the academic adviser. In general, all petitions must be endorsed by the academic adviser.

 

Resource Advisers

Staff members of the Dean of Students Office are available to students as resource advisers. Students who have questions about procedures, regulations, or problems are encouraged to use the Dean of Students Office (U.C. 210) as a resource or starting point.

 

Curriculum Transfer

Students who wish to transfer from one undergraduate college to another may do so if they have achieved sophomore status and are not on academic probation. Those students in good academic standing may transfer from one college to another at registration if approved by the appropriate dean of the college. After conferring with the associate dean in the new college about requirements and opportunities, the student must complete all forms for transfer no later than three weeks prior to registration for the semester in which they wish to make the transfer.

 

Special-Interest Advisers

Pre-law. Career Services, Donna Kosteva, Rauch Business Center.

Pre-medicine or other health professions. Health Professions Coordinator, Career Services, Donna Kosteva, Rauch Business Center.

Pre-MBA. Dean Kathleen A. Trexler, 104 Rauch Business Center

 

Registration

Registration involves the procedure whereby a student is officially enrolled in the University. Registration occurs immediately prior to the start of classes in each semester, and is the responsibility of the Registrar. No registration is accepted later than the tenth day of instruction in any semester, or the fifth day of summer session.

 

      If a student has any questions whatsoever concerning registration, he or she should consult the Registrar. The student is responsible for following correct procedures. A fee is levied for late registration.

 

      A student whose records have been closed for financial delinquency will not be permitted to register. (See Financial Responsibility).

 

Class Registration

Registration involves the selection of a roster of courses for the next semester and usually occurs shortly after mid-semester of the previous semester. Because each curricula follows different procedures concerning the times, places, and manner of registration, each student is responsible for registering at the proper time and place and in the proper manner.

 

      Publicity is given by both personal e-mail and electronic bulletin. If a student has any question concerning the time, place, or manner of registration, he or she should consult the academic adviser or academic dean.

 

      The student is responsible for following correct procedures. A fine is levied for late registration and for those who do not complete their registration and tuition payment prior to the announced payment date.

 

LVAIC Cross Registration

Currently enrolled full-time undergraduate degree seeking students in good academic standing who have achieved sophomore status may register for up to two courses per term that cannot be scheduled at the home institution at any one of the member institutions on a space available basis. The student must obtain the appropriate approvals of his or her own and the host institution. The courses must be in the normal academic load and not produce an overload. Courses numbered 400 and above (graduate level) are excluded from cross-registration.

 

      All grades of courses taken through the LVAIC cross registration will be accepted by the home institution and entered on the permanent record, and such grades will be used in computing the grade point average. Credits taken through the cross-registration process will be calculated as in residence. The number of credit hours assigned for a course is the responsibility of the home institution Registrar.

 

      Lehigh University students are not permitted to cross register for courses in All-January Inter-session Programs, the Evening Program at Muhlenberg College , all Weekend Courses at Cedar Crest College , or the Access Program at Allentown College . All independent study and correspondence courses are prohibited from cross registration without advance approval of the Lehigh University Standing of Students Committee.

 

      Summer Session: Lehigh students must have been registered full time in the prior spring semester to be eligible to cross register for a summer term. A maximum of two courses per session and 12 credit hours over the course of the entire summer may be rostered.

 

      Full-time students do not pay extra tuition for this opportunity (except Summer Session). He or she is responsible, however, for the costs and means of transportation and accepts the inconvenience of different calendars.

 

      Any student taking advantage of this opportunity must fill out a special pre-registration form for each course to be taken on another campus. These forms are available from the student's adviser or from the Registrar.

      The special ground rules governing this opportunity are as follows:

         1. A student must demonstrate sound academic reasons for taking courses at another college.

         2. If the course is offered at Lehigh, a student will not be permitted to take it at another college unless he or she cannot schedule the course and the student can show undue hardship as a result.

         3. The maximum number of hours a student is permitted in cross-registration is thirty.

         4. Lehigh students taking courses under cross- registration must secure the permission of their major advisers and of the Registrars at both institutions.

 

Class Hours

Regular class periods normally begin ten minutes past the hour and end on the hour. There is no regulation with respect to the length of time a class must remain in the classroom waiting for the teacher to appear after the normal starting time for the class.

 

Rosters

Each student is required to register a full roster of studies each semester as prescribed by the curriculum he or she is pursuing. Exceptions to this rule can be granted only by the committee on standing of undergraduate students or the dean of the student's college.

 

Dropping and Adding Courses

 Having once registered in any semester, a student may not add or drop any course without approval of the adviser during the first ten days of instruction.

 

      During the first five days of class, students may add classes with the consent of their advisers, without the permission of the instructor. During the sixth through tenth day of classes, both the adviser's and the instructor's consent is required to add a class.

 

      Students are not permitted to add classes after the tenth day of instruction. For exceptions due to special circumstances, a student may petition the Committee on the Standing of Students to add a course to the roster after the tenth day of instruction in a regular semester or the fifth day in a summer session. A withdrawal from a course within the first ten days of instruction is not recorded on the student's record. A student dropping all courses is considered to be withdrawing from the University (refer to Page 15).

 

      The student is responsible for following correct procedures. A fee is levied for adding courses after the tenth day of classes unless waived by the Committee on Standing of Students.

 

      A student wishing to withdraw from a course after the tenth day, but not after the eleventh week of instruction, must proceed as follows:

 

            The student presents the drop form to the adviser and the course instructor. Each signs the form to indicate that he or she has seen it and discussed it with the student, and notes appropriate recommendations.

 

            The signed drop form is delivered to the Registrar. A "W" for the course is recorded on the student's transcript.

 

            A student who officially withdraws from the University through the eleventh week of instruction will receive a grade of "W" in the courses for which he or she is registered.

 

            A student, who withdraws from a course or the University after the eleventh week of instruction, and prior to the end of classes, receives a WP or WF, as assigned by the instructor based on the student’s performance in the class at the time of withdrawal. For exceptions due to extreme circumstances, a student may petition the Committee on the Standing of Students, showing cause, to allow a grade of "W" to be recorded. The last day to drop a class with a WP or WF, as assigned by the instructor, is the last day of scheduled classes in a given semester.

 

Part-time

A student who reduces his or her course load below the minimum (twelve credit hours) required for standing as a full-time student, but does not withdraw from the University, or registers for a course load less than twelve hours becomes a part-time student for the rest of that semester. Some areas affected by part-time status are financial aid, health insurance, athletic eligibility, veterans' affairs, selective service, immigration status, and the privilege to reside on campus. Students should also be advised that part-time status affects certain family and group life health insurance plans.

 

Overloading

The normal course load is 14-17 credit hours (15-18 in the College of Engineering and Applied Science), encompassing 4-5 primary courses. The following special approvals are required for course rosters (including ranges produced by the drop/add process) that exceed the appropriate normal range.

 

1. Overload approval requirements vary by GPA and entry into the University. Typical loads are 14 to 17 credits. 18 credits is an overload for first semester students and for students with a GPA below 2.5. 19 credits is an overload for all other students. Unless the normal departmental program requires more credits, required overload approvals by grade point average are:

 

First semester students:                                  18-19, Associate Dean

                                                                               20 or more, SOS     

    

GPA below 2.5 :                                                 18, Associate Dean

                                                                               19 or more, SOS 

 

GPA between 2.5 and 3.5:                              19, Associate Dean

                                                                               20 or more, SOS   

  

GPA above 3.5 :                                                 19-20, Associate Dean

                                                                               21 or more, SOS

2. Overload approval will not be granted for the purpose of repeating a course.

3. No overload approval will be granted in a semester where the student is enrolled in a graduate course.

4. Any course(s) approved for overload cannot be added until after the end of the normal (three week) registration period. Space in a course cannot be reserved for students intending to add the course as an overload.

 

A Lehigh undergraduate may only take any 400-level course for which he or she is qualified. The qualifications are defined by the department and are certified by the course instructor and department chairperson through petition to the graduate and research committee.

 

A student's roster of studies as on file in the office of the registrar on the tenth day of instruction in a regular semester, or the fifth day of instruction in a summer term of eight weeks or less, is the student's official roster for that semester or term.

 

No courses may be added to a student's official roster of study except by special action of the chairperson of the department and the college dean, or by special action of the committee on standing of students, and then only under such conditions governing the student's probationary status as may be stipulated at that time. Courses may be dropped only under the conditions stated in section 3.8.4 (of R&P).

 

Overload limitations

Overload approval will not be granted for the purpose of repeating a course. No overload approval will be granted in a semester where the student is enrolled in a graduate course. Any courses approved for overload cannot be added until after the end of the normal registration period. Space in a course cannot be reserved for students intending to add the course as an overload.

 

Summer Session Overload

Students (graduate and undergraduate) are permitted to take two courses during any given summer session. The two courses may not be more than 8 credit hours. Students may not take more than two courses simultaneously. This includes combining short and long term courses. Students taking a full term course and two half term courses must petition the Committee on the Standing of Students of the Committee on the Standing of Graduate Students for an overload.

 

Less than Normal

 If a student has done poor work in the preceding semester, or if he or she is in poor health, or if he or she is compelled to spend considerable time in outside work to earn money, the student may be permitted or required by the curriculum director or academic dean to carry less than a normal load.

 

Repeating of courses

Students may repeat any grade. In a course in which a grade is repeated, the final grade received upon repetition of the course is counted in the cumulative average. The original grade and credit hours received will remain on record but be dropped from the cumulative grade point average.

 

      However, a student who fails a repeated course after receiving a passing grade the first time will have the original grade deleted from his or her average, but will retain credit for the course toward graduation.

 

      For deletion of a grade from cumulative average after repeating a course, a student must (a) file the deletion form with the Registrar's Office; and (b) repeat the course with a final grade at Lehigh.

 

      Students may not repeat a course taken for a regular qualitative grade using a course assigned pass/fail grading. Students may not repeat a course at another LVAIC institution in which they expect to have a Lehigh cumulative grade point average adjustment.

 

Waiver of Class Standing Prerequisite

All courses numbered from 100 to 399 have a prerequisite of upper-class standing unless the course is required earlier than the junior year on the student's official major program. For further information, students should see their major adviser or dean.

Waiver of Graduate-Standing Prerequisite

Juniors or seniors with a cumulative average of 3.00 or better may petition for the privilege of taking graduate courses (courses in the 400 category). The petition must be approved by the instructor of the course, the student's major adviser and the dean of the student's college. The petition should be filed during pre-registration. No such petition will be approved for a student carrying an overload. A petition to take graduate classes for a student with a GPA below 3.0 must also have permission from the Standing of Graduate Students Committee.

 

Auditing of Courses

A student who has incurred no scholastic conditions or failures during the previous semester may be admitted as an auditor in not more than one course. The course must be outside curriculum requirements. Application for such admission is made by petition. The petition requires the approval of the advisor, the chairperson of the department concerned, and the course instructor. In no case may a student who has attended a course as an auditor be given an examination for credit.

 

Vagabonding

 All full-time undergraduates have the freedom to visit classes for which they are not registered. The practice, which has come to be known as "vagabonding," includes only the permission to sit in the classroom, at the pleasure of the instructor. It does not include the rights either to participate in classroom discussion or to obtain credit for the course.

 

Pass/Fail System

This option is intended to encourage undergraduate students to explore challenging courses that would normally be avoided for fear of depressing grade-point averages. It is intended particularly for exploration outside of the major or minor. Courses numbered below 100 or above 400 cannot be taken pass/fail.

 

Students should avoid wasting this option on unsuitable courses, such as basic introductory courses having no college-level prerequisite or co-requisite. The restrictions on the use of pass/fail are listed below. Students who desire to take particular courses pass/fail must consult their academic adviser during pre-registration.

 

Each adviser should consider the intent of this system and the demands of the particular curriculum, then formulate suitable guidelines to aid students in the intelligent use of this option.

The restrictions on the use of the system are:

 

   1. Before a student may take a course pass/fail, he or she must have achieved sophomore standing, have declared a major, and be in good academic standing.

   2. A student may take no more than one course pass/fail in any one semester. He or she may take a maximum of six courses pass/fail per undergraduate career in a four-year program or a maximum of eight courses per undergraduate career in a five-year, two-degree program.

   3. No course may be taken pass/fail that satisfies any part of the degree requirements for a student's major, minor or distribution requirement as specified by the individual's college.

   4. A student designates the course to be taken pass/fail normally at pre-registration but no later than the end of the fifteenth day of instruction. Prior to this deadline, the student may transfer from pass/fail to regular grading and vice-versa. Summer Session deadlines are prorated according to the length of the session. The course designated for pass/fail grading by the student require the written acknowledgment of the academic advisor.

   5. The instructor giving the course is not officially notified which students are taking the course pass/fail. Therefore, the instructor reports a regular letter grade for the pass/fail students. The Registrar will then record "P" for reported letter grades of A, B, C, and D, and "F" for a reported letter grade of F.

   6. Under this system, the student surrenders his or her equity to letter grades A, B, C, or D if a course is passed. A passing grade applies to the student's graduation requirements but is not used in the computation of the cumulative average. An F grade is computed in the normal manner.

   7. Students are reminded that graduation with honors requires 60 graded Lehigh credits, thus excluding credits earned pass/fail.

   8. Students taking a pass/fail option may not have conventional letter grade assigned for any such course at a later date.

   9. Students who are planning to attend graduate or professional schools (law, medicine, architecture, etc.) are cautioned not to take any course pass/fail that might be considered a requisite for advanced work. Prior consultation in this regard with curriculum directors and professional school advisers is urged.

  10. Students are reminded that a "P" grade may not replace a grade in the cumulative GPA in a repeated course.

 

Transfer credit. Transfer of credit from other institutions is the responsibility of the Registrar. Any students planning to take work at other institutions in the United States or elsewhere should initially check with the Registrar on policies and procedures. Lehigh enrolled students may not be concurrently enrolled at any other institution, except for the LVAIC Consortium cross registered courses, without the advanced approval of the Committee on Standing of Students. Transfer of grades from institutions other than the LVAIC System is not possible. Students not currently enrolled should see the Leave of Absence Policy.

 

Withdrawal, Separation and Readmission

Withdrawal from the University Withdrawal from all classes on a student's roster constitutes withdrawal from the University. Undergraduates accomplish this through the Associate Dean of Students and graduate students through the Registrar. Withdrawal from one or more rostered courses, but not from all, is accomplished through the departmental or college adviser.

 

A student officially withdrawn from the University from the first day of class through the eleventh week of instruction receives a grade of "W" in each course from which he or she is registered; thereafter, a WP or a WF from each instructor. The date of the withdrawal will be noted on the academic transcript.

 

Withdrawal for Reasons of Health

Lehigh University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student whose physical or psychological/emotional health renders him or her incapable of meeting minimal standards of academic performance and/or making the social adjustment necessary for the exercise of competent citizenship, or both. When a student's physical or psychological health: (a) renders him or her incapable of participating successfully in the educational program of the University, or (b) poses a danger to him or herself or to the person or property of another, then the student may be withdrawn or some other modification of his or her status may be made. (See Guidelines for Separation and Readmission of Students for Reasons of Health).

 

Withdrawal Policy for Military Service

Students who are separated from the University for reasons of military service during the first seven weeks of the semester will receive a refund of full tuition credit for the next semester of attendance. If the student has attended for eight to ten weeks into the semester, incompletes will be assigned with two years to complete the work upon readmission.

 

Dropped from the University A student may be dropped for poor scholarship by action of the Committee on Standing of Students. (See Scholastic Standing).

 

Suspension from the University

 A student may be suspended from the University for academic neglect by action of the Committee on Standing of Students. (See Academic Warning System - Section 3's Academic Neglect).

 

      A student may be suspended from the University for disciplinary reasons by action of the University Committee on Discipline, the Dean of Students, or an administrative hearing . (See Code of Conduct).

 

Rescission of Registration

A student who has registered with check or checks returned for "insufficient funds" (bad checks) is liable to rescission of registration by action of the Dean of Students. In such case he or she may be required to vacate classes and residential unit. (See Financial Responsibility).

 

Not-Returning Notice

A student who does not expect to register for the succeeding regular semester, and does not intend on returning to Lehigh, should file a not-returning notice (available on-line at www.lehigh.edu/~inacsup ) or at the Office of the Associate Dean of Students (U.C. 210).

 

Undergraduate Leave of Absence

Each student is expected to complete the baccalaureate degree by attending Lehigh for four consecutive academic years. Once a student that has matriculated at Lehigh chooses to deviate from this attendance pattern a revised degree plan, coordinated with his or her adviser and associate dean, must be submitted with a request for a leave by completing a petition to the SOS Committee for an Academic Leave of Absence. Petitions are available from the Registrar's Office or the Dean of Students. The form must be signed by the student's faculty adviser, associate dean of the college and the completed form must be submitted prior to the start of any subsequent enrollment at another college or University.

 

      Current Lehigh University students are prohibited from concurrent enrollment at any other college or University. Courses taken concurrently will not be eligible to apply towards a Lehigh degree. An exception is made for cross registration at another LVAIC institution for up to the roster limit of 19 credits per semester.

 

      Special opportunity programs like the American University Internship, Hope College Urban Semester and the Institute for Shipboard Education (affiliated with another University) have limited access to Lehigh University students.

 

      For procedures concerning application for these programs please see the Associate Dean of Students for Academic Support.

 

      Students cannot assume that a leave will be granted to study at another college or University (this policy does not apply for study abroad through the auspices of Lehigh Abroad or LVAIC programs). The program of study and reason for the leave must be approved by the SOS committee.

 

      If unapproved leaves are taken, students are declared as non-returning and must apply for readmission to the University through the SOS committee if they wish to re-enroll. Courses taken at another college or University while on an unapproved leave will not be permitted to transfer toward a Lehigh University baccalaureate degree.

 

      In addition, students taking an unauthorized leave of absence must be aware that their eligibility for student aid is jeopardized.

 

      Any student who is uncertain about attending a future fall or spring term at Lehigh University is urged to discuss the matter with the Dean of Students Office or the Registrar prior to taking any action to withdraw or attend another college or University.

 

      Students may take courses at another institution during a summer term without requesting an academic leave of absence as long as no overload is rostered. Check with the Registrar's Office for limitations and processes for transfer course approval.

 

Readmission and Reinstatement

If at any time a student's connection with the University is discontinued due to failure to meet academic requirements, reinstatement is possible only by petition to the Committee on Standing of Students. Students seeking readmission after voluntary withdrawal should contact the Associate Dean of Students (U.C. 210) to initiate the process. The Request for Readmission form is available on-line at www.lehigh.edu/~inacsup.

 

A student whose records have been closed for financial delinquency will not be readmitted until his or her delinquency has been cleared.

 

University Housing

Refer to the “Living at Lehigh” Section of the Handbook for Guidelines for University Housing Withdrawal Procedures.

 

Attendance/Absence Policy

The University assumes that regular class attendance is an essential element of its academic operations. A student is personally responsible for the academic consequences of a poor attendance record.

 

   1. If, for any reason, any student is to be away from the University for an extended period of time (e.g., three consecutive class days), he or she has the responsibility of informing the associate dean of students before the absence. (If the student is unable to make the report, the living group is requested to make the report.)

   2. At the first class session after any absence or period of absence, the student ascertains from the instructor what make-up work is required, and when and how it becomes due. For officially approved inspection trips, athletic contests, or extra-curricular activities, a report is provided to each instructor describing the schedule and listing the names of students authorized to participate. For absences of other sorts, the student may, within one week after return to class, apply to the associate dean of students for an “absence information report.” All reports of absence are for information only and do not bind the instructor to any particular course of action.

   3. If a student appears to be neglecting the work in any course or interferes with the discipline of any course, the faculty member concerned notifies the associate dean of students, who warns the student and, upon the second report, may exclude him or her from the course which has been neglected. If a student is excluded from two or more courses, the case is brought to the Committee on Standing of Students for further action.

   4. Make-up privileges for a student absent during any part of the three days immediately preceding or the three days immediately following Thanksgiving, Christmas-New Year, or Spring recesses are denied, unless such absence is certified by the associate dean of students.

   5. Each instructor informs students in each course of his or her interpretation of these regulations as it applied to that course. This interpretation shall be made in writing at the beginning of each semester.

 

Illness During Hourlies

If a student is too ill to take a quiz or hour examination, including 4 o'clocks, he or she should not attempt to do so but should instead first seek medical attention and, following recovery, should observe normal procedures for obtaining an Absence Information Report through the Associate Dean of Students Office.

 

Make-ups for Quizzes

 Make-up policies for each course are determined by the instructor in writing. At class session after an absence or period of absence, the student shall ascertain from his or her instructor what makeup work is required and when and how it becomes due.

 

      Make-up privileges for a student absent during any part of the three days immediately preceding or the three days immediately following major breaks or recesses will be denied, unless the absence is certified by the Associate Dean of Students Office.

 

Makeup of Final Examinations

Illness  If a student is too ill to take a final examination, he or she should not report to the examination room, but should go directly seek medical attention. The student should immediately file with the Associate Dean of Students (U.C. Room 210) a petition for a make-up final examination endorsed by the course instructor, and the adviser, or academic dean. If the student receives medical attention from a doctor outside of the Health Center, verifiable documentation of illness and prescribed treatment must accompany the petition.

 

Three final exams within a calendar day A student with three examinations in a given calendar day may petition to have one of the examinations rescheduled to the make-up period. The student should take the petition to one of his faculty members and ask for his or her approval for a make-up exam on the regularly scheduled make-up day. If the faculty in each of the courses affected is unwilling to approve the make-up, the Registrar will determine which course the student will be entitled to take on the make-up day.

 

Other circumstance  In cases of absence from final examinations for exceptional reasons other than illness (e.g. death in the family), the student should consult the Associate Dean of Students Office (U.C. 210).

 

Grade indication for a missed final A student who misses a final examination receives an X (grade) for the course, e.g. X (D). (See Grading System - Absent from the Final Examination (X and Z grades) and Examinations and Quizzes - Makeup Examinations.)

 

Final Exam Make Up Day Any student receiving an Missed Final Examination X(*) grade and has been granted permission by the Committee on the Standing of Students (SOS) or the Committee on the Standing of Graduate Students (SOGS) is entitled to a make up exam. Students that have not filed a petition are not eligible to take a make up examination. The make up day is scheduled for the Saturday following the first week of classes in each term. Spring make up day is the first Saturday following the first week of summer session. Those students that are unable to attend the summer session date will have a make up scheduled on the fall term date.

 

Grading System

Course grades are A, A -, B +, B, B -, C +, C, C -, D +, D, D -, P, F, N (grade), X (grade) and Z (grade). Grades are weighted as follows: A, 4.0; A-, 3.7; B+, 3.3; B, 3.0; B-, 2.7; C+, 2.3; C, 2.0; C-, 1.7; D+, 1.3; D, 1.0; D-, 0.7; F, 0. WF is counted as an F, 0. Quality points for each course are assigned according to the number of credit hours in the course.

The meaning of each grade is as follows:

 

    * A, A -, excellent

    * B +, B, and B-, good

    * C +, C, competent

    * C -, continuation competency (the student has achieved the level of proficiency needed for the course to satisfy prerequisite requirements)

    * D +, D, and D -, passing, but performance is not adequate to take any subsequent course which has the course in which these grades were received as a prerequisite. See procedure to waive a prerequisite below

    * P, pass/fail grading with a grade equivalent to D - or higher

    * F, failing

    * N, (Grade), e.g. N (D), incomplete; with resulting grade, should the incomplete not be fulfilled

    * NR, grade not reported by the instructor, student should contact the instructor for the grade

    * X (Grade), e.g. X (F), absent from the final examination; with resulting grades should the final exam not be completed

    * Z (Grade), e.g. Z (F), absent from the final examination and incomplete with resulting grade should the course not be completed

    * Other symbols used for courses on student records are

          o Cr, credit allowed

          o W, withdrawn

          o WP, withdrawn with permission and with passing performance at the time of withdrawal

          o WF, withdrawn beyond the deadline and/or with failing performance, or both

          o Grades in the range of A through D -, P, and Cr may be credited toward baccalaureate degrees within the limits of program requirements. Grades of F, N, X, Z, W, WP, and WF cannot be credited toward degrees. Grades of F and WF that have not been bettered through repetition of the course will be included in computation of hours attempted and grade point average. Grades of W and WP do not count as hours attempted.

          o Courses in which grades of F, W, WF, N, X, or Z are recorded do not meet prerequisite requirements.

 

Grade appeals and availability of coursework to students

A student has the right to have all written materials submitted to meet the requirements of a course returned or made available for inspection. To be "made available" does not guarantee the right to a photocopy, but the materials may be examined in the faculty office or academic department office. All written materials not returned to the student must be retained by the faculty member or the department office for at least one long (fall or spring) session term following the completion of the course.

 

      A student questioning the validity of a grade must file the appeal to the faculty member of the academic department before the last class day of the long-semester term following the completion of the course. This does not limit the ability to correct a grade based on miscalculation or data entry error.

 

Waiver of Prerequisite. Prerequisites may be waived upon presentation of evidence of substantially equivalent preparation, if satisfactory, to the instructor in charge of the course, the teaching department chairperson and the chairperson of the student's major department.

 

      The records of all waivers are on a standard SOS petition form provided by the Registrar for listing the reasons for the waiver. The student's department chairperson will not approve the waiver unless adequate reasons are given. Waivers are filed at the time of registration. The Registrar notifies the student of action taken.

 

      If a student is accepted into a course based on an in-progress registration and later does not satisfy the prerequisite as a result of the final grade, the Registrar will remove the student from the course. The student will then be required to get a prerequisite waiver from the appropriate department.

 

Final Grades

Grades will be posted to the students' University web page on the designated date each term. Students who wish to have a printed copy must make the request in writing to the Registrar's office prior to final exams each term.

 

Release of Final Grades

Official reports of grades are issued to advisers and students by the Registrar as soon as possible following the deadline for reporting of grades. Instructors may develop their own policies for release of unofficial reports of academic progress to individual students, or to their chairperson, deans, or financial aid officers, on a need-to-know basis, including early release of unofficial final course grades. Any such policies must respect the rights of the student to privacy.

 

Conversion of X, N, Z(Grade) to F

 The grade used to indicate work not completed at the end of the term, will be converted to the parenthetical grade if a student fails to complete the work at the first scheduled make-up examination period or the end of the tenth day of class of the next regular semester. For a make-up examination, a student must submit a petition to the Registrar. (See Absent from the Final Examination (X and Z Grades).

 

Absent from the Final Examination (X and Z (Grades). The grade X (grade) is used to indicate absence from the final examination when all other course requirements have been met. The grade in parenthesis is determined by including in the grade calculation an F (or zero score) for the missing final exam. The X grade may be removed by a make-up examination if the absence was for good cause (e.g., illness or other emergency). To be eligible for the make-up exam, the student must file a petition and the petition must be approved by the Committee on Standing of Students. If the student fails to petition, or if the petition is not granted, or if the student fails to appear for the scheduled make-up examination, then the X grade will be converted into the parenthetical grade after the first scheduled make-up examination period, following the receipt of the X grade. If the petition is granted and the final examination is taken, the X grade will be changed by the instructor using the make-up examination procedures and the parenthetical grade will be dropped from the transcript.

 

      Where there are valid reasons for not taking the make-up examination at the scheduled time, the student may petition for a later examination with a fee.

 

      The grade Z (grade) is used to indicate both absence from the final examination and incompletion of one or more course requirements. The instructor calculates the parenthetical grade using an F (or zero score) for the final examination and either an F (or zero score) or the substitute method of calculation described in the section on Incomplete Work (N Grade).

 

      The Z grade may be removed by the procedures presented in the previous paragraph for removing the X grade. If this results in an N grade because the course work is still incomplete, the provisions of the section on Incomplete Work (N Grade) apply, except that in no case will the deadline for completion of the work be later than the last day of classes in the first full semester in residence (except summer) following receipt of the Z grade.

 

      Where failure to complete course work prevents the student from taking the makeup examination at the scheduled time, the student may petition the Committee on Standing of Students for a later examination.

 

      A Z (grade) that is still outstanding after the tenth day of instruction in the next academic-year semester following receipt of the Z (grade), will be converted into the parenthetical grade.

 

      X and Z grades do not count as hours attempted and are not used in computation of cumulative averages.

 

Incomplete N (Grade)

The grade N (grade) may be use to indicate that one or more course requirements (e.g., course report) have not been completed. It is the obligation of the student to explain to the satisfaction of the instructor that there are extenuating circumstances (e.g., illness or emergency) which justify the use of the N grade. If the instructor feels the N grade is justified, he or she assigns a grade of N supplemented by a parenthetical letter grade, (e.g., N(C)).

 

      In such cases, the instructor calculates the parenthetical grade by assigning an F (or zero score) for any incomplete work unless he or she has informed the class, in writing at the beginning of the course, of a substitute method for determining the parenthetical grade.

 

      In each case in which an N grade is given, the course instructor will provide written notification to the department chairperson stating the name of the student receiving the grade, the reason for the incomplete work, the work to be done for the removal of the N grade and the grade for the work already completed.

 

      A student who incurs an N grade in any course is required to complete the work for the course and have the grade submitted by the instructor to the Registrar by the tenth day of instruction in the next academic-year semester.

 

      The N grade will be converted into the parenthetical grade after the tenth day of instruction in the next academic-year semester following receipt of the N grade unless the instructor has previously changed the grade using the removal-of-incomplete procedure. The parenthetical grade will be dropped from the transcript after the assignment of the course grade.

 

      In no case will the grade N be used to report absence from the final examination when all other course requirements have been met.

 

      N grades do not count as hours attempted and are not used in computation of cumulative averages.

 

Academic Warning System

Section 3's (Academic Neglect ) If a student appears to be neglecting his/her academic responsibility in any course by excessive absence, failure to submit papers, take tests, or interfering with the discipline of a course, the instructor may file a report commonly known as a Section 3. The report is forwarded to the Associate Dean of Students for processing.

 

      The student is required to meet with their adviser, the course instructor, and the Associate Dean of Students, to discuss their need to improve their standing in the course.

 

      If a student receives a second Section 3 in a course, the Associate Dean of Students may remove him or her from the course. After the eleventh week of instruction, such exclusion results in a grade of WF and loss of equity in the course. Prior to the end of the eleventh week of instruction, a second Section 3 will result in the student being removed from a course and being assigned a "W" on his or her transcript.

 

      If a student is dropped from two or more courses through Section 3's, his or her case will be brought to the Committee on Standing of Students for a review and determination of their status. The Committee on Standing of Students may suspend a student from the University until such a time that the student shows evidence that he/she is able to perform responsibly.

 

Mid-term Grade Reports At mid-term in each semester, instructors have the option of reporting, through the Banner web system, grades for all freshman and sophomore students. These grade reports are available on the students' personal University web page.

 

Scholastic Averages and Probation

Scholastic requirements for undergraduate students are expressed in terms of the cumulative grade point average (GPA)--the weighted average of all grades received in residence or at institutions specifically approved for grade transfer. The cumulative GPA is computed at the end of each semester and the second summer session. Following are the cumulative GPA requirements for good standing:

Freshmen 1st Semester        0 to 22 credits earned          1.70

Sophomores                            23 to 52                                   1.80

Juniors And Seniors              more than 52                          2.00

 

      For computational purposes, students who have completed 22 or fewer earned hours at the end of the most recent graded term shall be required to achieve a 1.70 cumulative grade point average. Students who have completed 23 but fewer than 53 earned hours at the end of the most recent graded term shall be required to achieve a 1.80 cumulative grade point average. Students who have completed 53 earned hours at the end of the most recent graded term shall be required to achieve a 2.00 cumulative grade point average.

 

      Other undergraduates including all General College Division, Lehigh Valley Association of Independent College cross registered students, High School Scholars, and R.O.T.C. students will be required to achieve a 2.0 cumulative grade point average - the minimum average required for graduation - to remain in good academic standing. Non degree students with less than 12 credits attempted however will not have their progress evaluated until they earn at least 7 credits total.

 

Scholastic Probation Students who do not meet the above requirements will be placed on scholastic probation. Students who, regardless of their cumulative average, have failed more than eight hours of course work in any semester are also placed on scholastic probation.

 

      Any undergraduate student who achieves a l.69 or lower cumulative grade point average in a given term is eligible to be reviewed by and may be placed on probation at the discretion of the Committee on Standing of Students (SOS). A non degree student with two or more F grades is eligible to be reviewed by and may be placed on probation or dropped for poor scholarship at the discretion of the Committee on Standing of Students.

 

      While there is no specific credit hour requirement for good standing, certain categories of students (e.g., those on financial aid and those playing intercollegiate athletics) will be expected to maintain whatever hours are required for eligibility.

 

      A student who is on scholastic probation is ineligible for (a) intercollegiate competition and all other activities publicly representative of the University, (b) major office (elective or appointive) in any University organization, and (c) such other activity as may require more time than should be diverted from primary purposes by any student whose academic survival is at risk. All students, however, have the right of petition to the Committee on Standing of Students for exception to this rule in order to participate in one extra-curricular activity.

 

Removal from probation. Students are removed from probation at such time as they meet the standards listed above, effective at the end of any semester or the second summer session.

 

Dropped for poor scholarship

A student who fails to meet the minimum academic requirements for the first time will be placed on scholastic probation . In the student's following semester, if the requirements are again not met, the student will be dropped for poor scholarship , unless that term's semester average is 2.2 or better, in which case the student will be continued on probation. If a student goes on scholastic probation for the second but not consecutive term, a review by the Committee on Standing of Students will determine whether the student will continue on scholastic probation or be dropped for poor scholarship.

 

Examinations and Quizzes

Examinations fall into six general categories: final examinations, makeup examinations, anticipatory examinations, senior re-examinations, special examinations and hour quizzes.

 

Final examinations

 Final examinations are scheduled at the close of each semester. Formal withdrawal from any course before the end of the semester automatically cancels the student's right to an examination in that course.

 

      No student may be excluded, except for disciplinary reasons, from a scheduled final examination in any course for which he or she is registered and from which he or she has not been officially withdrawn.

 

      No final examination will be given or scheduled in one or two credit laboratory courses during the regular final examination period.

 

Make-up examinations

Make-up examinations may, upon petition to the Committee on Standing of Students, be granted in the case of unavoidable absence from a final examination in any course. Make-up examinations are scheduled by the Registrar. No fee is charged for a make-up examination when the original examination was missed through no fault of the student. If, however, the student misses the regular make-up examination as scheduled he or she must pay a fee of $10 for any subsequent examination granted. (See Grading System - Absent from the Final Examination (X and XN Grades).

 

Anticipatory examinations

Students who desire to establish credit at the University towards graduation may take anticipatory examinations with the consent of the Director of Admissions and the chairman of the department concerned. Only entering students who have completed advanced courses in approved secondary schools will be considered for such exams.

 

Senior re-examinations

A senior re-examination may be granted, by petition, to the Committee on Standing of Students, for not more than one failed course in each of a senior's last two semesters before graduation, provided that each of the following are satisfied: (a) the course is the only current deficiency; (b) the course is needed for graduation; (c) the senior had a passing average, as determined by the instructor, when he or she entered the final examination. A senior who fails a course in the next-to-last semester and is unable to repeat that course in their final semester or find a suitable substitute, may petition for a senior re-examination. No re-examination will be given earlier than thirty days after the close of the examination period for that semester.

 

Special Examinations

These include all examinations other than final examinations, make-up examinations, anticipatory examinations, and senior re-examinations.

 

      Upon petition and presentation of evidence that he or she had qualified for it, a student already enrolled at the University may be permitted to qualify for and take a special examination for credit towards graduation. Special examinations are granted only for extraordinary reasons and upon petition to the Committee on Standing of Students. There must be adequate supporting evidence of sufficient cause of granting special examinations accompanying each petition. The fee is $10 per examination.

 

      Students taking a special exam will have the grade and credits assigned to their permanent record here. Special exam credit will be counted as in residence credit and the grade will be used in all grade point average calculations. No special exam will be granted in a course that the student has already taken (except senior re-examinations), or in a course in which the student has already completed more advanced work at Lehigh.

 

Hour Quizzes

There is no rule limiting the number of quizzes a student may be required to write in one day. No quizzes or examinations are given in the five class days preceding the final examination period except in those laboratory courses ineligible for final examinations.

 

      Four o'clock quizzes are scheduled by the Registrar on appropriate dates in the sixth and eleventh weeks of the semester for multiple-section classes where it is desirable to give a uniform hour examination to everyone in the course at the same time. No four o'clock quiz may be scheduled without the advance consent of the Registrar.

 

Review-Consultation-Study Period

 The Review-Consultation-Study (RCS) period is intended to provide a few days for informal academic work between the end of the formal instruction period and the beginning of the final examinations. It is expected that students will use this period to consolidate their command of the material in their courses. Faculty members make themselves available to their students at announced times during the period; for example, at the hours when they ordinarily meet classes for instruction.

 

Academic Integrity

Statement of Academic Integrity

We, the Lehigh University Student Senate, as the standing representative body of all undergraduates, reaffirm the duty and obligation of students to meet and uphold the highest principles and values of personal, moral and ethical conduct. As partners in our educational community, both students and faculty share the responsibility for promoting and helping ensure an environment of academic integrity. As such, each student is expected to complete all academic course work in accordance to the standards set forth by the faculty and in compliance with the University's Code of Conduct.

 

This assumption of academic integrity is an essential element of the educational process. Sanctions do exist, however, for those who would betray this trust. Academic dishonesty in all forms is subject to disciplinary action and may result in disciplinary suspension or expulsion. University regulations governing cases of academic dishonesty may be found in the Code of Conduct as it appears in the Lehigh Handbook. Any form of cheating, including but not limited to, acts of plagiarism (the incorporation of the ideas or expressions of another in one's own work without proper acknowledgement) and acts of collusion (the unauthorized collaboration with any other person in preparing work offered for credit) are subject to disciplinary action under that code.

 

Breaches of academic honesty are dangerous to both the morale and reputation of the University. They undermine the principle of truth upon which Lehigh was founded. The academic integrity of every student is important so that Lehigh may continue its proud tradition of excellence.

 

For a defined explanation of academic dishonesty, see University Judicial System - Code of Conduct.

 

Grievances

Students may seek redress of various grievances within the University through the agencies and procedures described in under this heading. The Associate Dean of Students (U.C. 210) is available to discuss with students the nature of their grievances and to advise them on the recourse open to them.

 

Redress of Academic Grievances

An undergraduate (or group of undergraduates) with a complaint arising out of any course should bring the complaint first to the instructor of the course in which the grievance occurred. If, after meeting with the instructor, the student feels that satisfaction has not been received, the complaint should then be taken to the instructor's immediate superior, and so on up the line, from the instructor of a section to the faculty member in charge of all sections of the course, the department chairperson, and the dean of the college.

 

      If the student (or group of students) believes the grievance should not go to the instructor, he or she should take it to the instructor's immediate superior. In case of doubt as to whom to bring the grievance, the student should consult the dean of the college or the Dean of Students Office.

 

      A graduate student (or group of graduate students) with a complaint arising out of any course or research activity should bring the complaint first to the responsible faculty member. If, after meeting with the faculty member, the student wishes to pursue the matter further, the complaint should then be taken to the department chairperson, and the dean of the college.

 

      If the student (or group of students) believes the grievance should not go to the faculty member, he or she should take it to the department chairperson. In case of doubt as to whom to bring the grievance, the student should consult the dean of the college, the Dean of Students Office, or the University Ombudsperson.

 

Right of Appeal of Academic Grievances

A student failing to gain satisfaction in the manner described above may appeal by petition to the Committee on Standing of Students or, for graduate students, the Committee on Standing of Graduate Students.

 

      In general, a student has the privilege of petition about any academic matter of concern to him or her in the University. Petition forms are available in the Associate Dean of Students Office (U.C. 210) and the deans of the colleges. These deans will advise the petitioner with regard to procedure.

 

Redress of Grievances Based on Discrimination

 Any student complaint of discrimination, if such complaint is not within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Standing of Students, the Graduate and Research Committee, or the University judicial system, will be dealt with in accordance with the following procedure. This includes appeals regarding accommodations granted by the Office of Academic Support for Students with Learning Disabilities.

 

      For the purpose of this procedure, a grievance is a claim that a student has been discriminated against on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, marital status, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status in violation of the University's policy on Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Non-Discrimination.

 

      Before filing a formal grievance, the complainant should discuss the complaint with Associate Dean of Students (U.C. 210) who will then advise on an appropriate course of action. This step provides an opportunity for the informal resolution of a situation that may be discriminatory. In such a resolution, the Associate Dean may refer the student to other sources of help or serve as a mediator between the student and the perceived source of the problem.

 

      Where the matter is not subject to informal resolution, the student may file a formal grievance with the Associate Dean of Students (U.C. 210) who serves as designee for the Provost for receipt of such grievances under the University's Policy on Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Non-Discrimination.

 

Formal Grievance Procedures

 

1.        The Provost will appoint one or more administrators or faculty to review, investigate, and interview the parties involved in a grievance alleging discrimination.

 

   2. The grievance should be in writing and should provide the name and address of the grievant, the nature and date of the alleged violation, the name of the person or group responsible for the alleged violation, and any relevant background information.

   3. The person or persons alleged to be responsible for the action that resulted in the grievance should with reasonable promptness following receipt of a copy of the complaint send to the investigator(s), with a copy to the grievant, a statement explaining the rationale for the action complained about.

   4. An investigator(s) may be challenged for cause by either party and such challenge will be decided by the Provost.

   5. The investigator(s) of a grievance alleging discrimination will promptly undertake an examination of the information provided by both parties in such manner as seems appropriate to the investigator(s) to fully bring to light all aspects of the grievance. Any additional information arising in the investigation will be made known to both parties. The investigator(s) is/are expected to use their judgment and consult or refer a grievance to other University offices or resources to bring about an amicable resolution between the parties if this is acceptable to both, and may, at any time, dismiss a grievance that the investigator(s) consider to be unjustified.

   6. The investigator(s) will prepare a written report on each grievance for submission to the Provost, with a copy to both parties. The report will set forth the findings of the investigator(s), conclusions regarding the merit of the grievance and a recommended disposition of the case. While such recommendations are to be accorded serious consideration, they are advisory and not binding upon the Provost. The Provost will make a final decision regarding the grievance and, if necessary or appropriate, decide any remedial actions. The Provost will notify both parties and the investigator(s) in writing of the decision.

 

Redress of Grievances Based on Harassment. (See University Policies and Guidelines - Policy on Harassment).

 

Academic Honors

Dean's List. At the end of each semester, the Dean of Students publishes a list of all regular undergraduates who during that semester made a scholastic average of 3.60 or better and carried at least twelve hours of regularly graded courses (A, B, C, D, F). Students placed on the dean's list are awarded certificates of their achievement. Students completing more than twelve credit hours in the two summer sessions may petition the Committee on Standing of Students to be placed on the Dean's List.

 

Prizes and Awards

Student academic prizes and awards are announced at Honors Convocation in April and at the commencement exercises on University Day in May or June.

 

Prestige Fellowships

The Office of Fellowship Advising (OFA) helps Lehigh undergraduates apply for competitive national fellowships and scholarships. It publicizes opportunities, oversees the selection of candidates for awards that require University nomination and, with the assistance of Fellowship Advisors, guides students through the frequently complicated application procedures. Undergraduates who are interested in applying for awards and faculty members working with motivated, well-qualified students are encouraged to visit the website at www.lehigh.edu/~inofa/

 

Phi Beta Kappa. The oldest honor society in the United States is represented at Lehigh by the Beta chapter of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the 27th oldest chapter in the nation. The chapter’s council considers for invitation into its membership those students in each of Lehigh’s three undergraduate colleges who satisfy the following profile:

 

    * At least 60 credit hours of coursework completed at Lehigh University

    * A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.75

    * A minimum of 8 credit hours in the natural sciences (including a lab)

    * A minimum of 8 credit hours in the social sciences

    * A minimum of 8 credit hours in the humanities, especially textual analysis beyond first-year English (the council typically does not recognize some courses that carry Humanities credit at Lehigh, such as Public Speaking, Stage Design, on-credit Music lessons, etc.)

    * Calculus or advanced mathematics that requires calculus as a prerequisite

    * Two years of college-level foreign language study or its equivalent (may be satisfied by four years [9-12] of high school study with excellent grades; or by a proficiency exam administered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literature)

    * No disciplinary violations sufficient to warrant probation, suspension, or expulsion

 

Please note: Satisfaction of this profile guarantees consideration by the Phi Beta Kappa council; it does not guarantee election to Phi Beta Kappa. Any undergraduate who has questions about any of the items in the profile should contact Professor Scott Gordon, Executive Secretary of Lehigh’s chapter.

 

Special Opportunities

Many special academic opportunities are available to Lehigh students in both organized programs and independent research. Such opportunities are described in the current University catalog. In addition, a number of departments offer summer research, cooperative programs, or internships. For information about such programs, students should consult the chairman of the specific department. For other programs, see the contacts listed under Prestige Fellowships.

 

College Scholar Program. The College Scholar Program, open to especially well qualified students in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers a unique opportunity for special seminars, an individually structured program, and close faculty contact. Interested students should consult Professor Ian P. Duffy, 340 Maginnes, Ext. 83362 no later than the sophomore year.

 

Graduation Requirements

Eligibility for Degree In order to be awarded a degree by the University, a candidate for a baccalaureate degree must achieve a minimum cumulative average of 2.00.

 

      To be eligible for the award of a degree, a student must not only have completed all of the scholastic requirements for the degree, but also must have paid all University fees, and all bills for the rental of rooms in the residence halls, for damage to University property or equipment, for any other indebtedness for scholarship loans, or for loans from trust funds administered by the University.

 

      Students on University suspension will not be awarded a degree.

 

Graduation Honors

 Degrees "with honors" are awarded by note of the University faculty to those students who have attained an average of not less than 3.40 in a minimum of ninety credit hours in residence at Lehigh University or in programs approved by the faculty to have grades and credit accepted toward the undergraduate degree.

 

      Degrees "with high honors" are awarded by note of the University faculty to those students who have attained an average of not less than 3.60 in a minimum of ninety credit hours in residence at Lehigh University or in programs approved by the faculty to have grades and credit accepted toward the undergraduate degree.

 

      Degrees "with highest honors" are awarded by note of the University faculty to those students who have attained an average of not less than 3.80 in a minimum of ninety credit hours in residence at Lehigh University or in programs approved by the faculty to have grades and credit accepted toward the undergraduate degrees.

 

      For the purposes of graduation honors calculations, courses taken more than once at Lehigh will only have the most recent grade used in the calculation. Courses taken under the cross registration policy of the LVAIC will be used in the graduation honors calculation.

 

      Students who spend part of their career at another institution, or are transfer admits to degree programs and have fewer than ninety hours of in residency courses, may qualify for graduation honors under the following conditions:

         1. The student must have at least sixty hours of regularly graded (not pass/fail) work in courses that meet the residency requirement. The graduation honors category is determined by the lower of the two averages computed as follows: (1) the average of grades received at Lehigh; (2) the average of all grades received at Lehigh and grades for courses taken elsewhere for a regular grade and that are appropriate to be considered for transfer to Lehigh, or in provisionally approved study abroad programs.

 

Responsibility for Academic Requirements Each student is responsible for his or her progress toward meeting specific requirements for graduation. Academic advisers and department chairpersons are available to assist the student. It is strongly recommended that the student specifically consult with their adviser prior to the senior year to ascertain eligibility for the degree for which he or she desires to qualify and to determine that all program and hours requirements are met.

 

Degree Audit Report System (DARS) A computerized Automated Summary of Academic Progress (ASAP) degree audit form is available through the Registrar's Office. This form is designed to assist the student with completing their degree requirements. It provides a listing of completed courses as they apply to the degree and, where possible, lists requirements and courses remaining to be completed.

 

Final Date for Completion of Requirements  In order to be allowed to graduate , all requirements, scholastic and financial, must be satisfied prior to graduation exercises. (Normally 8:30 a.m. the Wednesday preceding commencement.)

 

Application for Degree Candidates for graduation on University Day in May or June file with the Registrar on or before March 1 an application for the degree; candidates for graduation in January file an application for degree on or before November 1. Failure to file such notice by the dates mentioned results in a late fee of $25.00. No applications will be accepted after the Wednesday prior to graduation.

 

Eight-year Rule All work to be credited toward a baccalaureate degree must be completed within an eight-year period. If the requirements are not completed within this period, upon petition, the program will be reviewed by the Committee on Standing of Students, which may require a special program.

 

90-30 Hour Rule  To be eligible to receive a Lehigh baccalaureate degree, the candidate must have completed either a minimum of ninety hours in residence at the University or the last thirty semester hours. "In residence" does not refer to living in University housing. It refers to studies completed at Lehigh University.

 

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