CEE Students Carry on Tradition of P.C. Rossin


PC Rossin Junior Fellows

The Rossin Fellowship Program honors the entire breadth of the Lehigh engineering experience by honoring faculty who've demonstrated excellence and outreach at a young age, by teaching Ph.D. candidates the ins and outs of a career in academia, and by imparting on undergraduate students the importance of giving back.

Six civil and environmental engineering students three graduate and three undergraduate joined the program during a formal induction ceremony hosted by the P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science this spring.

Rosalin Mendez, Alysson Mondoro, and WuRong Shih joined the Doctoral Fellowships program. They'll have the opportunity to take two one-credit courses Preparing for the Professoriate and Teaching and Presentation Skills designed specifically to give members of this program the skills they need to accelerate their professional development. They were introduced by John Coulter, the college's associate dean of graduate studies.

Sarah Dudney, Justin Klee, and Joseph Lucia, all of the undergraduate class of 2017, were inducted into the Junior Fellowships program, which is primarily devoted to university and community service. Junior Fellows have worked on projects at Broughal Middle School. They also give tours to prospective students and help first-year students with the course registration process. Dr. Panos Diplas, professor and chair of the civil and environmental engineering department, welcomed the undergraduate students into the program.

The Rossin Fellowships Program is part of the Rossin family's endowment to the college in 1998, the largest single gift ever given to the university. Peter Rossin was a WWII pilot before receiving his B.S. from the university in metallurgical engineering. He later founded Dynamet Inc., a titanium alloy company.

Read more about the program and see a full list of this year's recipients at the Lehigh University News Center.

-John Gilpatrick

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