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Direct impact

60 middle school girls find that CHOICES in science can be fun and cool, courtesy of Lehigh’s Society of Women Engineers.

 

Research showcase

Cancer therapy research takes top prize at the David and Lorraine Freed Undergraduate Research Symposium.

 

Global stature

Lehigh ISE named finalist in new prestigious award – the only department of its kind to make the list.

Payscale and Bloomberg BusinessWeek discuss the ROI of a Lehigh degree, U.S. News and World Report ranks engineering graduate program among nation’s best.

Professor Dan Frangopol and Nader Okasa ’10 PhD win prestigious research award from the American Society of Civil Engineers.

NSF grants CAREER awards to Lehigh’s Gang Tan and Parv Venkitasubramaniam — as well as ChemE graduate and current Cornell faculty member Susan Daniels '99, '01G, ’05PhD.

MORE STORIES: Student Success | Faculty & Programs | Alumni
In the News   Dean's Note

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Nano Voyeur

A cross-disciplinary Lehigh research team develops a “silver voyeur to monitor cell secretions,” earning coverage from the journal ACS Nano as well as the NSF’s LiveScience news service, GigaOM, and several other outlets.

 

Within its National Engineers’ Week special coverage, USA Today identifies Lehigh’s Chris Jewell ’03 as one of the “new faces of engineering.”

The Philadelphia Inquirer explores the efforts of civil engineering associate professor Clay Naito to better understand the infrastructural impact of natural disasters.

Undergraduates with Lehigh’s Enterprise Systems Center help Nestle Waters keep cool – and save tens of thousands a year.

Chemistry World covers the successful efforts of Animangsu Ghatak ’03 PhD to coax a polymer to propel itself up an incline.

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Dear Friends,

S. David Wu
S. David Wu
Dean and
Iacocca Professor

The Spring Semester has drawn to a close, and with it we’ve seen a flurry of good news and progress to report.

Recently, Lehigh was ranked twelfth in the nation according to tuition return on investment, or ROI– what graduates earn in their careers compared to their college costs.

Read more >

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Resolve

View the online magazine >

Dean's Note

WuDear Friends,

The Spring Semester has drawn to a close, and with it we’ve seen a flurry of good news and progress to report.

Recently, Lehigh was ranked twelfth in the nation according to tuition return on investment, or ROI– what graduates earn in their careers compared to their college costs. The PayScale/Bloomberg BusinessWeek 2012 College Return on Investment (ROI) Report compared more than 1200 U.S. colleges, placing Lehigh ahead of half the Ivy League as well as CMU, Georgia Tech, and UC Berkeley, among others. Furthermore, we continue our solid top 50 showing in the annual graduate school rankings conducted by U.S. News & World Report. While no ranking can comprehensively measure an institution’s worth, I think you'll find these to be interesting indicators of the value the market places on a Lehigh education.

The latest issue of Resolve magazine is available in print and online, with a review of Lehigh efforts to bring efficiency and “systems thinking” to the realm of healthcare delivery. Research in this area is a focal point for Lehigh, and we recently conducted a one-day workshop with leaders from academia, government, and industry to address areas of potential collaboration among these players. Stay tuned for more on this effort as it develops; in the meantime, if you’d like to be added to the Resolve mailing list, please send us an email with the words “Resolve mailing request” in the subject heading.

Lastly, I invite you to review our College’s new Web site at www.lehigh.edu/engineering. Within, you'll find new and compelling content about our research and educational programs as well as faculty, student, and alumni achievements. The site incorporates social media and other Web-based approaches to help us connect directly to key groups and tell our story in a dynamic and compelling manner. You’ll also note a fresh approach to defining the role of the modern engineer and Lehigh's strengths thereof. Other notable areas of the site include an expanded "Academics" tab that takes a truly outcome-based, student-centered approach to describing alignment between an individual's interests and various pursuits within engineering.

Please drop me a line with your feedback and, as always, thank you for your support of Lehigh Engineering.

Best regards,
dean's signature
S. David Wu, Dean and Iacocca Professor

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Student Success

David and Lorraine Freed Undergraduate Research SymposiumEach year, Lehigh Engineering gives students the opportunity to showcase their research efforts via the David and Lorraine Freed Undergraduate Research Symposium. In April, in the STEPS building lobby, research projects were presented by students in a contest that demonstrates their research skills as well as the breadth of research opportunities available at Lehigh. Students competed for travel stipends to attend professional conferences, as well as the coveted “People’s Choice” vote. And for the second year, “The Rivalry” with Lafayette was extended beyond the football field, as several Leopard student teams participated successfully as well. Project topics ranged from technology to support for autistic learning (Michael DiBlasio ’12) to bridge safety (Carley Miller ’12, Kelsey Sheridan ’12) to advanced financial portfolio management (Weisi Zhang ’13.) The team of Deniz Cetin and Andrew Pike, Class of 2012, took first prize for research in cancer therapeutics. Their research, conducted over the last year under the supervision of assistant professors of chemical engineering Bryan Berger and Mark Snyder, explored nanoscale drug delivery systems that would allow for sustained release of cancer medication. The annual event is endowed by Andrew D. Freed ’83, a member of the RCEAS advisory council, in honor of his parents. For more, check out the article, the 3-minute YouTube video, and the Picasa photostream.

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In recognition of the 40th anniversary of undergraduate women at Lehigh, President Alice P. Gast announced that the university has established a new $1 million endowed scholarship program to support women studying in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. At Lehigh today, one in four undergraduate engineering students are women, which exceeds the national average of 18.6 percent. “Lehigh is a leader in educating female engineering students and this scholarship support will give us the opportunity to build on that leadership,” said Gast, an internationally renowned chemical engineer. “We want to send the message that Lehigh is a great place for young women to pursue science, mathematics and engineering. There is a national need for well-educated STEM graduates and it is important to increase the number of women going into these fields.”

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CHOICESLehigh’s Society of Women Engineers chapter hosted some sixty students from area middle schools on campus in late March to take part in CHOICES, a program sponsored by Lehigh Engineering that encourages girls to explore career opportunities in science and engineering through hands-on activities. “Not only are girls coming to Lehigh, but they’re coming to Lehigh to be engineers,” said SWE chapter president and materials science major Paige Sutton ’12. “It’s great to know that we’re having a direct impact, and that what we’re doing here is contributing to the field as a whole.” See complete coverage, including a short video, via the Lehigh News Center.

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Lehigh environmental engineering graduate student Michael German is recipient of a Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship beginning in October 2012. The Fellowship will support a trip to India where he will support efforts to improve access to clean, safe drinking water, mainly in rural areas. This trip will continue the efforts of his advisor, Professor Arup SenGupta of civil and environmental engineering, who is currently on a Fulbright sabbatical in India, working toward the same purpose. Throughout his graduate studies Mike has focused upon treating naturally contaminated groundwater in a sustainable manner, and he believes the Fulbright trip will provide a broad perspective on the challenges of community infrastructure development.

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Nestle WatersFor Nestle Waters, a few degrees on the thermostat can mean big money. When students from Lehigh’s Enterprise Systems Center pointed out a glitch in the processes of the company's state-of-the-art Breinigsville plant that was keeping temperatures two degrees cooler than necessary, top directors took notice. “We were cooling water more than we needed to,” said Peter Rittenhouse, Nestle Waters' supply chain director. “Lord knows when we would have found it.” Read the full story in the Allentown Morning Call.

 

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Lehigh computer engineering student Alexander Galakatos ’12 and economics student Allyson Coff ’12 were among the outstanding student entrepreneurs honored at Lehigh’s seventh-annual INNOVATE! CELEBRATE! awards dinner, hosted by the Baker Institute for Entrepreneurship, Creativity and Innovation. Winning ventures ranged from cross-cultural art projects and fashion exchanges to energy snacks and water purification systems. This year a new award -- the so-called ‘i Prize’ -- went to Streamback, a venture founded by Galakatos and Coff. Sponsored by Todd Welch ’10P, the new award recognizes the “coolest idea on the verge of implementation.”

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Qianyang “Bonny” GuoChemical engineering PhD student Qianyang “Bonny” Guo was recognized at the annual Spring Symposium of the Catalysis Society of Metropolitan New York. Guo tied for first place in the poster competition consisting of 30 graduate students from Columbia, Stony Brook, Rutgers, Princeton, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Lehigh, and University of Delaware. The symposium was held in New Jersey with participants from the U.S., Turkey, Spain, France, and Thailand. Guo works in the Emulsion Polymers Institute at Lehigh under assistant professor Mark A. Snyder.

 

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Civil engineering senior Frank Artmont ’12 was presented with the 6th annual Association for Bridge Construction and Design (ABCD) Scholarship Award by the organization’s Susquehanna chapter. Frank was selected based on his academic credentials and his essay “A Rising Issue: Deteriorating Infrastructure in Pennsylvania.” As an undergraduate, Frank has served as a research assistant with Sougata Roy, a senior research scientist with Lehigh’s ATLSS Center. Frank will continue his graduate studies in structural engineering at Lehigh under Roy’s supervision.

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ECESteven Avena, Henry Luo and Jordan Thimot took first place in a competition among their peers in electrical and computer engineering. They completed the project as part of a one-year, senior-level lab required of all ECE majors. They competed in a poster presentation session April 27 that featured the work of 22 teams -- 45 students in all. The winning team mathematically modeled and developed a device that uses a digital bandpass filter to measure and detect the unique harmonic properties that distinguish an HIF from other types of faults. Second prize in the contest went to the team of Basel Alnajjab and Christopher O’Lone. Their project, “Chesstastic,” is a chessboard equipped with sensors, magnets and a microprocessor whose squares light up to show a player options for moves and captures. All of the students are members of the Class of 2012.

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Environmental engineering PhD student Elizabeth DiCesare was recently awarded 2nd place for the Academic Achievement Award for her Doctoral Dissertation by the American Water Works Association (AWWA). DiCesare’s work involved the interaction between a waterborne pathogen, Cryptosporidium, and environmental biofilms. Elizabeth is advised by associate professor of earth and environmental sciences Bruce Hargreaves and associate professor of environmental engineering Kristen Jellison. AWWA was founded in the late 1800’s to allow for the free exchange of information regarding water safety and management around the world, and offers these awards to encourage academic pursuits in the public water supply field.

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Matthew DerrMatthew Derr ’12G, a recent graduate student from industrial engineering, completed a multi-year project with Kennywood Amusement Park in Pittsburgh, PA, to find solutions to issues such as allocation of the park’s seasonal workforce, attendance forecasting, and research related to customer experiences at the park’s new Sky Rocket roller coaster attraction. With the advice of project advisors George Wilson and Robert Storer, Derr developed a simulation computer model of the park’s Sky Rocket attraction, and a custom-designed software tool that recommends allocation of employees by taking into consideration trends in attendance, employee availability, and the park’s physical layout.

 

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Mechanical engineering graduate student Justin Barton ’09 has been selected to participate in the 62nd Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting this July in Lindau, Germany. The weeklong meeting consists of more than 25 Nobel Laureates and 550 young researchers coming together to discuss various topics related to physics and to facilitate discussion among scientists from different backgrounds. Barton earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering with a minor in aerospace engineering from Lehigh in 2009, and is currently working toward a PhD under the supervision of Eugenio Schuster, associate professor of mechanical engineering, in the Complex Physical System Control Laboratory.

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Alex Weldon, a Ph.D. candidate working with James Gilchrist, associate professor of chemical engineering, won the Kenneth A. Earhart award from the Emulsion Polymers Institute in recognition of his excellence in colloid research. He was also recently named a P.C. Rossin Doctoral Fellow and cited by Lehigh's Graduate Student Senate for contributions to the university through promotion of graduate student initiatives.

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More than 550 juniors and seniors were honored for academic achievement at the university’s Honors Convocation on March 30 for achieving a GPA of 3.6 or higher or earning other academic accolades. Dean David Wu focused on Lehigh’s “magical, unprecedented and historic” win over Duke in the first round of the NCAA men’s basketball playoffs to remind attendees of the importance of attitude, behavior and character. Wu introduced Megan Colville ‘12 who spoke as Lehigh Engineering’s student representative to the event. A Martindale Student Associate and an Admissions Fellow with concentrations in industrial engineering and political science through the Integrated Degree in Engineering, Arts & Sciences (IDEAS) honors program, Megan has future plans to attend law school.

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Lehigh structural engineering students took part in the Student Steel Bridge Competition that was held at Lafayette College during the annual American Society of Civil Engineers mid-Atlantic conference in late April. The students constructed the bridge in 26 minutes and 51 seconds and spent 25 seconds on repairs, all completed well within the allotted build time of 30 minutes. The bridge held a vertical load of 1100 pounds with a deflection of 0.01” and a lateral load of 50 pounds with a lateral deflection of 0.42”.  Lehigh placed third out of the 10 teams competing, besting “The Rivals” of Lafayette. The Lehigh team was comprised of Dan McLaughlin ’13, Ralph (Richard) Missimer ’12, Anthony Wheeler ’12G, David Crowley ’12, Hung Do ’14, Andrew Hansen ’14, JP (Carlos) Hohl ’12, Carley Miller ’12, Mallory Nigro ’12, and Cristina Ponte ’12.

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Faculty & Programs

U.S. News & World ReportIn its recently released 2013 survey of U.S. graduate schools, U.S. News & World Report has ranked Lehigh Engineering 43rd out of 194 engineering colleges that grant doctoral degrees. “Engineering is key to innovation and economic competitiveness,” said Dean David Wu, “and research and graduate programs in engineering seed that innovation. I am pleased that the college’s research and graduate programs continue to be ranked among those of the top research universities in the nation.” The rankings appeared in the magazine’s “America’s Best Graduate Schools for 2013” issue in early April.

 


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In a recent study by Bloomberg BusinessWeek and Payscale, a Lehigh education has once again been rated as one of the top 15 in the nation in terms of its return on investment. According to the 2012 College Return on Investment (ROI) Report published in April, Lehigh graduates can expect a net ROI of $ $900,900 – or 9.8% annually -- over a 30-year period. This is the third year of this study, which examined some 853 colleges and universities nationwide, and the third time Lehigh has ranked among the top 15. The Payscale.com ROI ranking is intended to help students and parents evaluate the "payback" value of a student's undergraduate degree.

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ISELehigh’s Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) has recently celebrated a number of significant accomplishments from its community, most notably the department’s finalist status for the UPS George D. Smith Prize. The prize, awarded for the first time this year, is based on a given program’s ability to prepare students in the areas of operations research, management science, or analytics. Lehigh ISE is the only full academic department in the nation to earn this status.

 

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A cross-disciplinary Lehigh bioengineering research team reported in the journal ACS Nano that they've developed a new type of plasmonic biosensor that outperforms current nanoplasmonic devices by a factor of ten. According to coverage of the breakthrough in the NSF’s “LiveScience” news service, the device contains two parallel, nanometer-scale slits etched a few microns apart into a thin film of silver, all deposited on a glass slide. When an incident light beam is focused onto one of those slits, the electrons at the outermost surface of the metal film oscillate, causing a surface plasmon polariton, or SPP, to propagate along the surface of the metal. For more on the project, see “Moving toward ‘real-time’ detection of proteins” in the current issue of Lehigh Engineering’s Resolve magazine.

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nanotechnologyLehigh’s Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology is partnering with the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development and eight other higher-education institutions to host the PA Nanotechnology 2012 conference on June 5, 2012, at the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. Stephen Tang ’85G, ’88PhD, President & CEO, The University City Science Center and member of the Lehigh Engineering Advisory Council, will be on hand to deliver a keynote address. The conference explores viable nano-based strategies, programs, and resources to assist economic development via education and job creation and retention. It will promote collaborative nanotechnology research, education, technology transfer, entrepreneurship, and commercialization within the Commonwealth.

 

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Prof. Dan M. Frangopol, Lehigh’s Fazlur R. Khan Chair of Structural Engineering and Architecture, recently earned significant honors from organizations the world over. Frangopol was recently elected as the first and only honorary member of the International Association for Bridge Maintenance and Safety (IABMS)-China Group in Shanghai, China, where he also presented the Tonjii University Wenyuan Lecture entitled Life-Cycle Reliability, Risk and Resilience of Civil Infrastructure Systems. In Europe, he was named as an International Expert Evaluator for both the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. Closer to home, he was also named an Inaugural Fellow of the Structural Engineering Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Yet perhaps most notably, he and his recently-graduated student Nader Okasha ’10PhD received the 2012 Wellington Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers, which honors impactful research in transportation and related fields.

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NSFTwo engineering faculty members have recently been named as recipients of highly-competitive NSF CAREER Awards. Assistant professor Gang Tan of computer science and engineering received the CAREER award for his research "User-Space Protection Domains for Compositional Information Security," which focuses on protecting user information from attacks on software applications. Assistant professor Parvathinathan Venkitasubramaniam of electrical and computer engineering also scored with a recent CAREER Award, for his research into online privacy, as applicable to a range of networked systems.

 

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Lehigh is accepting applications for enrollment in a new one-year professional graduate program in technical entrepreneurship (M.Eng, TE) that will begin this summer. Believed to be one of only a few of its kind in the U.S., the new program is offered by Lehigh Engineering and cosponsored by the Baker Institute for Entrepreneurship, Creativity and Innovation. “People know how to create and innovate, but don’t know how to commercialize,” says John Ochs, professor of mechanical engineering and mechanics, who helped develop the curriculum. “A product doesn’t do any good until it gets to the market. In this program, we surround that spark of an idea with the right tools and experience to help make that leap.” TE helps young entrepreneurs create, refine and commercialize intellectual property through the licensing or launching of a new business. After completing the program’s first session in the summer, students are eligible to compete for thousands of dollars in seed funding, some of which is available only to students in the program.

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tsunamisAssociate professor Clay Naito of civil and environmental engineering is studying the stress caused by debris upon buildings and other infrastructure during tsunamis, hurricanes and floods. Naito is conducting his research in Lehigh’s Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems (ATLSS) Research Center, using shipping containers as models for the types of debris that could pose a threat. This work, inspired by recent natural disasters in New Orleans and Japan, has been covered by the Philadelphia Inquirer, among other venues.



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Lehigh University’s Integrated Product Development Program (IPD) was recently selected to be included in the National Academy of Engineering’s Real World Engineering Education publication. The publication will recognize 29 innovative programs at universities around the country that foster real-world experience through engineering education. Lehigh’s award-winning IPD program allows students from different disciplines to come together to work on industry sponsored projects. Students use the skills that they have developed through their previous courses to solve real-life problems, fostering teamwork, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

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integrated healthcare deliveryIn mid-May, Lehigh hosted a workshop that explored research directions and challenges in the field of Integrated Healthcare Delivery. The workshop was organized by a committee from Lehigh's faculty in computer science and engineering, economics, industrial and systems engineering, and management. This committee is developing a broad Lehigh research network comprised of academic, industry, and government partners that will work with regulators and granting agencies to provide patients with informative and high quality care while making use of resources in the most efficient manner possible. Visit http://www.lehigh.edu/ihd for more about Lehigh’s efforts in this emerging field.

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In July, professor Mayuresh Kothare will take over as the chair of chemical engineering at Lehigh. Dr. Kothare recently became one of only two chemical engineers to be named as a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His research includes constrained and optimal predictive control theory, embedded control of biomedical systems, neuroengineering, and closed loop neuroprosthetic systems. In this role, Kothare will be succeeding professor Anthony McHugh, who will be stepping down from the position he has held for nine years to return to the faculty.

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In early March, students in Lehigh’s Professional Master’s degree in Energy Systems Engineering presented their graduate projects in this year’s Energy Systems Engineering Institute Graduate Research Symposium. The students presented their works to industry mentors and leaders such as PPL, the Department of Energy, and the Electric Power Research Institute, among others. Through these capstone projects, ESE students apply what they learn to real issues while immersed in industry settings.

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The New Art of ShipbuildingProfessor Joachim Grenestedt and his research vessel The Numerette are featured in a video piece -- The New Art of Shipbuilding -- about Grenestedt’s research and interaction with students. The Numerette is the product of more than a decade of design, testing, mathematical modeling and construction. Grenestedt, professor of mechanical engineering and mechanics and director of Lehigh’s Composites Lab, believes the craft is the largest to date made with panels of a composite sandwich material bonded to a stainless steel frame.



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Harvey G. Stenger, former dean of the P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science, was named in early 2012 as president of the University of Binghamton. (See the YouTube video of the announcement.) More recently, he’s served as dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Stenger, who oversaw an expansion of the Lehigh engineering college’s academic programs, research and funding support during his six years as dean between 1993 and 1999, was praised by colleagues at Lehigh and SUNY-Buffalo for his devotion to people, especially students. Before his appointment as dean at Lehigh, Stenger served as co-chair of the chemical engineering department and director of the Environmental Studies Center.

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Nine faculty members from Kazan National Research Technological University (KNRTU) visited Lehigh for two weeks this semester to begin to establish ties between the two institutions. The delegation was attracted to Lehigh because of its “world-level excellence in research and education in the area of polymers. During their stay, KNRTU’s faculty members attended lectures by 16 Lehigh professors who conduct polymer-related research. They concluded by forming a partnership with Lehigh that envisions future student and faculty exchanges and academic and research collaborations. The visit was sponsored by Lehigh’s Emulsion Polymers Institute, Center for Polymer Science and Engineering, and Office of International Affairs.

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Alumni

EcoTech MarinePat Clasen ’04 ’07G and Timothy Marks ’04 ’06G were undergrads, aquarium hobbyists and tinkerers when they had their first big idea. Today, they are principals of EcoTech Marine Marine in Bethlehem. Along with their partner Justin Lawyer, the duo recently won the Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania’s award for entrepreneurial achievement. According to the BFTP announcement, EcoTech has grown substantially over the past three years and is on track for more than 12 million in revenue for 2012, almost doubling its 2011 sales. Beginning with three founders, the company now employs 30, plans to add 10 more full-time team members this year, and is seeking new space that quadruples its current area.

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Lehigh welcomed 700 pint-size visitors to campus in late April as part of a program designed to give young students early exposure to college. The young scholars, all second- graders, came from New York City’s Success Academy Charter Schools. The Success Academies are free, high-performing public charter schools serving children in kindergarten through sixth grade. Each year, the network sends students to visit a college or university in an effort to start them thinking about their academic futures. Chuck Strauch ’57, a member of the board for the consortium of schools as well as a member of Lehigh’s Engineering Advisory Council, suggested Lehigh as a great place for the students to visit. The students were accompanied by 170 teachers and 30 other adults from their schools.

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Dr. Christopher Jewell ’03 was recently recognized in USA Today in its “New Faces of Engineering” during National Engineers Week, nominated by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Jewell graduated from Lehigh with dual degrees in chemical engineering and molecular biology. He completed his PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2008 and is currently a Ragon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, working under Professor Darrell Irvine in the departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering. Jewell uses biomaterials and nanotechnology to develop vaccines in biodegradable polymer depots. These can be inserted in the lymph nodes to gradually release the vaccine over time, and could lead to improved treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

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Whitney Chen ’05, who graduated with a degree in industrial engineering, returned to campus in March to talk about her recent success in a different discipline -- cooking. Chen is a former contestant on the TV show The Next Food Network Star, and works as a line chef at Per Se in New York City. She also writes for a food magazine, and in her spare time she is developing a nonprofit foundation and writing a cookbook. Chen recently hosted a cooking demo and a brown bag lunch on campus, discussing her passion for cooking. Even though she no longer works as an engineer, Chen values her experience at Lehigh and the skills she learned through her time as an industrial engineer.

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The student chapter of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) recently sponsored an address by Ellen Iobst ’81, senior vice president of Sunny Delight Beverages Co. Iobst, who earned a B.S. in chemical engineering, said women have contributed to the engineering professions in two significant ways -- by seeking consensus leadership and by viewing challenges in holistic ways. She made her remarks to an audience of students, faculty, engineering alumnae and industry representatives at SWE’s annual dinner April 11 in the University Center. Iobst, whose father, grandfather and brother are Lehigh engineering alumni and whose son is currently an industrial engineering major, said it is the responsibility of today’s women engineers to improve the field for future generations.

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Dr. Susan DanielsDr. Susan Daniels '99, '01G, ’05PhD has been granted the highly-competitive CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation. The award will support her work with cell membrane micro domains, which has applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, infertility, and diabetes. The five year award will allow Dr. Daniels to further the research she is doing with her students while promoting women in STEM fields. The general theme of her research group is the study of transport and dynamics at biological interfaces. In 2007, Dr. Daniels joined Cornell University as an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, and received her PhD in chemical engineering from Lehigh in 2005.


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Martin Faga ’63 ’64G was interviewed by Military and Aerospace Electronics magazine about his perspective on current space research and exploration. Faga has played a major role in the space arena for many years, including holding the office of CEO for six years at Mitre Corporation, and a current seat on its board of trustees. Before joining MITRE, Mr. Faga served as Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space, and as Director of the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) where he was responsible to the Secretary of Defense and the Director of Central Intelligence for the development, acquisition and operation of all U.S. satellite reconnaissance programs. Mr. Faga received bachelor and master of science degrees in electrical engineering from Lehigh University in 1963 and 1964.

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Joseph M. Pietrantonio ’82 ’86G has been named vice president, Environment, Health, Safety & Quality, and corporate chief engineer at Air Products. He is responsible for managing technical risks at a corporate level, and cultivating and developing technical skills among the company’s employees. Pietrantonio joined Air Products in 1982 as a participant in the company’s Career Development Program. He assumed increasing levels of responsibility at Air Products over his career, most recently serving as vice president, Global Operations. Pietrantonio received B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Lehigh University in 1982 and 1986, respectively. He attended Stanford’s Executive Program in 2007 and holds two U.S. patents.

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Gary Epstein ’68 is returning to the FCC as a senior advisor to the chairman and co-lead of the Incentive Auction Task Force. Epstein graduated from Lehigh with a B.S. in electrical engineering with honors and went on to receive his Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School, also with honors. He previously worked at the FCC as the Common Carrier Bureau Chief, the first head of the Digital Television Transition efforts, and chairman of the Industry Advisory Committee for the 1995 World Radio Communication Conference. Epstein is recognized as an expert in telecommunications law and worked for 25 years at Lantham and Watkins, founding and serving as the global chair of the communications practice group.

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A team of scientists in India, led by a Lehigh chemical engineering PhD, have developed a technique that enables a polymer to propel itself up an incline while carrying a weight. Led by Dr. Animangsu Ghatak ’03 PhD, the team used swelling interactions of an elastomer that occurs when the elastomer is in contact with a solvent to successfully propel the cylinder up an incline. The work is inspired by the work of his former PhD advisor, professor Manoj Chaudhury. This research, in its infancy, could have significant impact in applications such as sensing or soft robotic components.

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Arthur F. Veinott Jr.The department of industrial systems and engineering hosted Arthur "Pete" F. Veinott Jr. ’56 as part of its Schantz Distinguished Lecture Series in mid-April. Veinott graduated from Lehigh with a B.S. in Industrial Engineering and a BA in Arts and Sciences, and went on to graduate from Columbia with an Eng.Sc.D. in Industrial Engineering. Veinott is Professor Emeritus of Operations Research at Stanford University, and throughout his career has received numerous accolades for his work in the field. His research includes operations research and management science with interest in optimization and programming. Pete was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (1986) and awarded the John von Neumann Theory Prize by INFORMS. He was selected as a Guggenheim Fellow, an Inaugural Fellow of INFORMS, and a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

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Michael Burns ’89 has been named national sales manager for Mitsubishi Waterjet, which markets high-end instrumentation for fabrication and manufacturing in diverse industries, from mining to aerospace. Burns has most recently served as president of TECHNI Waterjet, Lenexa, KS, having held the position since 2007. Prior to 2003, Burns’ career with Ingersoll-Rand spanned more than 20 years, as he served in various engineering, account management and sales capacities. Burns earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Lehigh and an MBA from University of Michigan.

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